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Thread: lawsuit

  1. Banned
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    #1

    lawsuit

    1 His $50k lawsuit isn't even close to being realistic.
    2 His $50k lawsuit isn't even close to having realistic chances of winning.
    3 His $50k lawsuit has no chance to proceed.
    4 His $50k lawsuit has no chance of being successfull.
    5 He will never come through with his $50k lawsuit.
    6 There's no way to success (or succeed?) for his $50k lawsuit.

    Which ones are correct?
    Last edited by krisfromgermany; 31-Dec-2016 at 09:01.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: lawsuit

    #4 is the only one that seems grammatical, natural and logical to me.

    2, 3, 5 and 6 are ungrammatical.

    #1 isn't logical. If the lawsuit already exists, it doesn't make sense to say that it can't be realistic. It's already real.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: lawsuit

    I took #1 to mean the amount wasn't realistic, rather than the suit itself - he should be seeking a different amount.

    Unless I'm missing something obvious, I don't see why #2,3 and 5 are ungrammatical, although I'd prefer #2 with 'a realistic chance' vs. 'realistic chances'.

    I'd agree #5 isn't very natural, but if for some reason I was counting on somebody to file a lawsuit and but didn't think they'd actually do it, I could see saying #5.
    Last edited by Skrej; 31-Dec-2016 at 12:54. Reason: expanded
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  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: lawsuit

    2 would be OK if it used "a realistic chance", not "realistic chances".
    3 would be OK with "no chance of proceeding", not "no chance to proceed".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: lawsuit

    Number four is clearest. It's the best choice.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: lawsuit

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    2 would be OK if it used "a realistic chance", not "realistic chances".
    3 would be OK with "no chance of proceeding", not "no chance to proceed".
    I still see no problem with 'chance to proceed' - in fact it ranks slightly higher than 'chance of proceeding' on an Ngram, although they're close and seem to have flip-flopped throughout history.

    I still agree that the singular version with ' a realistic chance' is preferable, but I still find the other grammatical, if less desirable.

    Maybe these are AmE/BrE differences.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  7. Piscean's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: lawsuit

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Maybe these are AmE/BrE differences.
    I don't think so This speaker of BrE agrees with you on this. I don't like those three sentences, but I don't think they are ungrammatical.

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