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Thread: syllables

  1. Newbie
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    #1

    syllables

    Hi, i am student of english language in second academic year, and i could not attend lectures at the university, so now i am dealing with syllables ( i am not understanding them)

    And my question is, could you please tell me: what are strong and weak syllables?,where do we use them?, where is the difference between them?

    your answers would help me very much.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: syllables

    In English, strong syllables are the stressed syllables. Weak syllables are unstressed. Every time you have a new vowel sound (not necessarily a new letter) you have a new syllable.

    The strong syllable normally contains the 'correct' pronunciation of that vowel. We tend to reduce the unstressed syllables to a schwa /ə/ sound, or something close to a schwa.

    There are some rather complicated rules that govern syllable stress, but versus trying to commit those to memory (which no native speaker would reference, or likely even know), I suggest you simply consult an English dictionary. Any decent dictionary will indicate syllable divisions, as well as syllable stress. There will also be a pronunciation guide.
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  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Delija View Post
    Hi, I am a student of ​English, language in my second academic year, and I could not attend some lectures at the university, so now I am dealing with syllables (I am not don't understanding them).

    And My question is: Could you please tell me (no colon here) what are strong and weak syllables are? (no comma here) Where do we use them? (no comma here) Where What is the difference between them?

    Your answers would help me very much.
    Note my corrections above. I am surprised that someone in their second year of studying English at university doesn't know that we capitalise the word "I", all proper nouns, the correct way to construct a question and the basics of punctuation.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Newbie
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    #4

    Re: syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    In English, strong syllables are the stressed syllables. Weak syllables are unstressed. Every time you have a new vowel sound (not necessarily a new letter) you have a new syllable.

    The strong syllable normally contains the 'correct' pronunciation of that vowel. We tend to reduce the unstressed syllables to a schwa /ə/ sound, or something close to a schwa.

    There are some rather complicated rules that govern syllable stress, but versus trying to commit those to memory (which no native speaker would reference, or likely even know), I suggest you simply consult an English dictionary. Any decent dictionary will indicate syllable divisions, as well as syllable stress. There will also be a pronunciation guide.
    Thank you very much Teacher Skrej, i am very grateful to you.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: syllables

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Note my corrections above. I am surprised that someone in their second year of studying English at university doesn't know that we capitalise the word "I", all proper nouns, the correct way to construct a question and the basics of punctuation.

    Thank you for your corrections Teacher emsr2d2, but this is my first time posting in "UsingEnglish.com" and i thought that your job here is not to correct my mistakes,but to help me if you can.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: syllables

    Thank you very much, Teacher Skrej. I am very grateful to you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Delija View Post
    Thank you for your corrections Teacher emsr2d2, but this is my first time posting in "UsingEnglish.com" and I thought that your job here is not to correct my mistakes, (space after a comma) but to help me if you can.
    By correcting all your mistakes, we are helping you. That's how the forum works. I'm sure you will come to appreciate the extra assistance you get from the volunteers here.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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