Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Key Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 1,742
    #1

    the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    Hello everybody!

    I would like to ask you a question about the word "shower" (noun).

    1. When I am in the process of taking a shower, I say "I am in the shower".
    2. When I have just entered the shower cabin, I say "I have got under the shower".
    3. When I have just left the shower cabin, I say "I have got out of the shower" or "I have got out from under the shower".


    Bacause I don't know whether I am right or wrong, could you please correct my thinking if necessary.

    Thank you.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,281
    #2

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    For the second, I'd say "I've [just] got in the shower".
    For the third, I'd say "I've [just] got out of the shower".

    There's nothing wrong with "under the shower" but it's not necessary. The first is fine.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
    Key Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,914
    #3

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    In AmE a 'shower cabin' is known as a 'shower stall'.

    A Google search seems to confirm that 'shower cabin' is the correct term in BrE, however.

    An American would likely parse that as completely separate building. I spent several summers as a camp counselor, where due to limited bunk space, the showers were located in various communal shower houses, which is what I initially assumed the OP was referring to.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #4

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    In 2 and 3, it would depend on whether the shower was running when you entered and exited the stall. "Under the shower" generally means that the water's running. So you can enter the shower stall without getting under the shower.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,281
    #5

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    I have never heard or used "shower cabin" in the UK. In a domestic bathroom, if you have a shower enclosed by glass, one of them being a door, it's a shower cubicle. It's called the same thing in public areas (ie in the changing rooms at the gym or at a swimming pool).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 13,739
    #6

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I have never heard or used "shower cabin" in the UK.
    You are not alone.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,281
    #7

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    You are not alone.
    In the shower I am!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Europe
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 13,739
    #8

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    How dull.

  9. Skrej's Avatar
    Key Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,914
    #9

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    I just assumed 'shower cabin' was used in BrE based on a number of UK websites selling something called 'shower cabins', which came up during a Google search. I guess that's what I get for trusting the internet.

    Perhaps it's just some marketing term then.
    http://www.jtspas.co.uk/shower-cabins-372-c.asp
    http://www.betterbathrooms.com/showe.../shower-cabins
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,281
    #10

    Re: the word shower "noun" used depending on an activity

    I've heard a "shower cabinet" being used to refer to these. Admittedly, searching Google Images for the term "shower cabin" brings up exactly the same pictures but I've never heard it. As you say, it might be a marketing term or a technical term used by those in the industry, just not by us normal people!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] "depending on which side of yarrow you are on" - meaning?
    By Olympian in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 21-Jun-2014, 18:56
  2. [Grammar] Word for noun groups depending on function?
    By NikkiBarber in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Dec-2010, 06:29
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2008, 09:52
  4. Plural form of the word "future" as a noun
    By Help in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-May-2005, 11:55

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •