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    #1

    The building of a university is usually beneficial to the area in which the universit

    "The building of a university is usually beneficial to the area in which the university is located." (My teacher's handout)
    Is this sentence correct? What does "the building of a university" mean here? Is the THE before "building" necessary? We would say: Jogging is a good thing. We would not say: THE jogging is a good thing. That's why I have questions on "the building" here. Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: The building of a university is usually beneficial to the area in which the unive

    The sentence is correct. An analogous sentence about jogging would say The practice of jogging is beneficial to the heart.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: The building of a university is usually beneficial to the area in which the unive

    The use of the article is an example of the labels 'verbal nouns' and 'gerunds' that some writers make.

    In 'Building a university is beneficial ..., ' building has a direct object, and is therefore a gerund, a form of the verb.
    In 'The building of a university is beneficial ...', building has a definite article before it, and is therefore not any part of a verb. It is a verbal noun.

    After discussing this and a dozen other uses of the -ing form, Quirk et al (A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, 1985.1290-1292) decide not to distinguish between gerunds and participle, using only the label participle, but they do retain the label verbal noun.

    Huddleston and Pullum (2002.1188-1190) label all these -ing forms gerund-participles, though they do (p 81) refer to the verbal noun forms as gerundial nouns.



    Relax, learners. Unless you are studying linguistics or your English teacher has an obsession with labels, you don't have to worry about these fine distinctions and labels.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Jan-2017 at 19:44.

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