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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "Mike loves to go swimming, however; his parents won't allow him to go today."

    Hello all,

    I have four questions:

    1.Are all these punctuation correct?Could you please correct me?
    2. Couldn't I use the 'but' in the same way that 'however' is punctuated?
    3. Is the sentence which includes 'however' considered as 'dependent clause' or 'independent' ?
    4. And is the whole sentence considered as 'complex sentence'?


    "Mike loves to go swimming; however, his parents won't allow him to go today."

    "Mike loves to go swimming. However, his parents won't allow him to go today."

    "Mike loves to go swimming. His parents, however, won't allow him to go today."

    "Mike loves to go swimming. His parents won't allow him to go today, however."

    "Mike loves to go swimming, however his parents won't allow him to go today."

    So many thanks. Sorry for asking too many questions.
    Last edited by nininaz; 13-Jan-2017 at 16:46.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Mike loves to go swimming, however; his parents won't allow him to go today."

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Hello all,

    I have four questions:

    1.Are all these punctuation correct?Could you please correct me?
    2. Couldn't I use the 'but' in the same way that 'however' is punctuated?
    3. Is the sentence which includes 'however' considered as 'dependent clause' or 'independent' ?
    4. And is the whole sentence considered as 'complex sentence'?


    "Mike loves to go swimming; however, his parents won't allow him to go today." This is okay. These are two independent clauses joined with a semicolon.

    "Mike loves to go swimming. However, his parents won't allow him to go today." This is okay. Simply two independent clauses.

    "Mike loves to go swimming. His parents, however, won't allow him to go today." This is okay and places emphasis on his parents. Two independent clauses.

    "Mike loves to go swimming. His parents won't allow him to go today, however." This is okay but less natural. Two independent clauses.

    "Mike loves to go swimming, however his parents won't allow him to go today." This is not okay - it's a run-on sentence.

    So many thanks. Sorry for asking too many questions.
    Your title is incorrect.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike, however, loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. However, Mike loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike loves to go swimming, however. - This is what you used. Do you see how it's different?
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "Mike loves to go swimming, however; his parents won't allow him to go today."

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post

    2. Couldn't I use the 'but' in the same way that 'however' is punctuated?
    3. Is the sentence which includes 'however' considered as 'dependent clause' or 'independent' ?
    "But" is a conjunction, used to join two independent clauses. Put a comma before the "but.
    All would be "Mike loves to go swimming, but his parents won't allow him to go today."

    In casual writing you can start a sentence with a conjunction. Don't use this style in an essay or anything formal:
    Mike loves to swim. But his parents won't let him go to day.

    "However" is not a conjunction. It doesn't make what follows a dependent clause. The two clauses have equal weight.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. nininaz's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Mike loves to go swimming, however; his parents won't allow him to go today."

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Your title is incorrect.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike, however, loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. However, Mike loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike loves to go swimming, however. - This is what you used. Do you see how it's different?
    Thanks for your reply. it was so helpful.
    How about the following:
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim; however, Mike loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike however loves to go swimming.
    Peter and Jim don't like to swim. Mike loves ,however, to go swimming.
    Can it be correct?
    Is 'however' a transition? and transitions like coordinating conjunctions used to connect two independent clauses. In contrast, subordination used to connect independent and dependent clause.
    Could you please give me a reliable source on 'transition phrases and words'?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by nininaz; 13-Jan-2017 at 19:28.

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