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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Hasta la última línea

    Hello everyone,

    It´s bery tricky for me to translate " hasta la última línea " as I don´t know if I can use "until" or until is only used for time expressions.

    Here there is an example. Tienes que sumar todo hasta la última línea del archivo.

    You have to sum everything until the last line of the file
    You have to sum everything to the last line of the file
    You have to sum everything up to the last line of the file
    You have to add up everything until the last line of the file
    You have to add up everything to the last line of the file
    You have to add up everything up to the last line of the file


    Would you say add everything up or add up everything or both?

    Many thanks

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Hasta la última línea

    Don't use until. Up to is correct but still somewhat ambiguous, which is why we sometimes say "up to and including" in such cases. Is it an excel file? We might say row instead of line, or item, or figure. The word line more commonly refers to text lines, such as prose, or computer programs, but for numbers, it sounds rather like a layman's term.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: Hasta la última línea

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Don't use "until". "Up to" is correct but still somewhat ambiguous, which is why we sometimes say "up to and including" in such cases. Is it an excel file? We might say row instead of line, or item, or figure. The word "line" more commonly refers to text lines, such as prose, or computer programs, but for numbers, it sounds rather like a layman's term.
    Note my suggestions above. This kind of text is much easier to read when text being discussed is marked by surrounding it in quotation marks or by setting it in italics.
    I am not a teacher.

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