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  1. VIP Member
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    #1

    Trying to hold on to his

    I am wondering if my sentence sounds natural. Is it correct to use a dash, as I did it?

    The painter was terminally ill, trying to hold on to his most cherished love -- his painting.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    Was someone trying to grab the painting off him?

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    #3

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    teechar,

    I meant to say his painting, as an activity. Probably my sentence is ambiguous.
    Should I write instead, "his most cherished activity - painting."

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    #4

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    It's still ambiguous. Can you provide some context or a more detailed explanation of what you're trying to convey?

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    #5

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    I think his most cherished love: painting works fine. Activity would work, too. I've used a colon, but a dash is also possible.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    teechar,
    This sentence is not part of a story or a text. I just saw a phrase " hold on to", and I tried to make my own sentence. I wished to say that painter was dying and the only thing that he still had in his life was his activity, his painting.

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    #7

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    Do you mean something like "Even though the painter was terminally ill, he was determined to carry on painting for as long as he could"? (For now, I'm leaving aside the question of "hold on to"; I'm just trying to ascertain the intended meaning of the sentence.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    The painter was terminally ill, trying to hold on to his most cherished activity:/- his painting.

    I see no problems with either that or GS's suggestion, his most cherished love:/- painting.





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    #9

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    emsr2d2,

    The meaning of the sentence is almost as you have formulated it. But if I have written a sentence similar to yours, I think it would just describe a fact, which my sentence does not intend. Of course, I am not a native speaker, but to my ears "hold on to his most cherished love - paintings" carries deeper connotation. In the moments of his demise and desperation, he clings to his only love and hope.

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    #10

    Re: Trying to hold on to his

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    to my ears "hold on to his most cherished love - paintings" carries deeper connotation. In the moments of his demise and desperation, he clings to his only love and hope.
    Your words convey that idea clearly to me.

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