Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Junior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2016
    • Posts: 80
    #1

    "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    Recently I've come across the statement that this verb - "to begrudge" has different meaning in the United States and in Great Britain.

    BrE: to be angry with sb because they have sth you think they don't deserve; to envy
    AmE: to be unwilling to give somebody something

    Is it not used the other way around?

  2. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,363
    #2

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    The statement is incorrect.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Junior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Oct 2016
    • Posts: 80
    #3

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    The statement is incorrect.
    In what way?
    Does the word mean both these things is both 'versions' of English?

  4. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,363
    #4

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    It doesn't mean to be unwilling to give somebody something​ in American English.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,421
    #5

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    It doesn't mean that in BrE either. If you begrudged giving something to somebody, it means you actually did give it to them but you do so without good grace (or reluctantly).

    Every week I have to give my flatmate 10 towards the heating bills. I really begrudge giving it to her because she never pays her share.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. probus's Avatar
    Key Member
    Retired English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2011
    • Posts: 3,745
    #6

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    With respect I disagree. I have always felt that "give reluctantly" was a valid meaning of begrudge and I have used it that way myself.
    Last edited by probus; 24-Jan-2017 at 04:01.

  7. Skrej's Avatar
    Key Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,826
    #7

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    I guess it depends whether you consider 'unwilling' and 'reluctant' synonymous. There's a slight difference to me, but I can see how some would consider them the same.

    Personally, if I'm unwilling to give, you're not getting it without force. If I'm reluctant to give, I really don't want to, but will eventually let you have it once I admit the necessity.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,421
    #8

    Re: "to begrudge" - BrE and AmE

    If I'm unwilling to give my share of the heating bills to my flatmate, I don't give it to her. If I'm reluctant to give it to her, it means I have some reservations but, ultimately, I almost certainly give it to her.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. "must" in BrE and AmE
    By Verona_82 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Jul-2011, 09:45
  2. Example of AmE vs BrE?
    By emsr2d2 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 15-Sep-2010, 03:44
  3. You said it! (AmE, BrE)
    By retro in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-Dec-2006, 04:01
  4. BrE or AmE?
    By demir in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Nov-2006, 22:57
  5. AmE vs BrE
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 28-Sep-2004, 15:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •