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Thread: Mallorca

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    #1

    Mallorca

    Please check if both versions are correct.

    1 Why do everybody want to spend their vacations on Mallorca? There are dozens of similar Mediterranean islands.

    2 Why does everybody want to spend his/her vacations on Mallorca? There are plenty of not so different destinations in the Mediterranean Sea.

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    #2

    Re: Mallorca

    " Why does everybody want to spend their vacations on Mallorca?"
    Otherwise, the second sentence of 1 is better for stylistic reasons.

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    #3

    Re: Mallorca

    Is it a general rule that "everybody" can't be followed by "he/his" or "she/her"?
    When I talk to a group of males and say something like "Everybody should try and score as many goals as he can" or "Everybody should try and play the best game in (or of?) his carreer" it would be wrong?
    Last edited by krisfromgermany; 25-Jan-2017 at 13:22.

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    #4

    Re: Mallorca

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    When I talk to a group of males and say something like "Everybody should try and score as many goals as he can" or "Everybody should try and play the best game of his carreer", it would it be wrong?
    No. It would be correct.

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    #5

    Re: Mallorca

    Let's say there was a mixed male/female team. Then I'd have to say "Everybody should try and score as many goals as they can"?

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    #6

    Re: Mallorca

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    Let's say there was a mixed male/female team. Then I'd have to say "Everybody should try and score as many goals as they can"?
    Yes.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Mallorca

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    Is it a general rule that "everybody" can't be followed by "he/his" or "she/her"?
    No, it's the opposite actually. 'Everybody' is singular, and so traditionally required a singular pronoun. At one point in the past, masculine pronouns were the default, unless you specifically knew that you were referring to women. Then that got branded as sexist, and there was a movement to 'his or her/he or she". However, that was cumbersome, and people began using 'they/their'.

    Some grammar purists might still insist of one of these conventions for an unknown or mixed group, but use of a third-person plural pronoun as a generic singular pronoun has become common. I don't know if it's quite the standard yet, but it might be the norm. It's certainly rarely questioned. It's not just a recent shift either. You might still hear some people using the masculine default or even the paired approach, though.

    I frequently use 'they/their' myself, although I try to avoid it when teaching, simply because the distinctions are a bit too nuanced for most of my students. They still struggle a bit with number and gender references as it is.

    When I still get sentences like "They is happy see to hims", I'm reluctant to introduce further variables....
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