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Thread: Mr Black

  1. Member
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    #1

    Mr Black

    Teaches, is Black family name or first name if I call someone Mr Black?

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Mr Black

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike12345 View Post
    Teachers, Is 'Black' the family name or first name if I call someone 'Mr Black'?
    It's the family name (or surname).

    Note my use of quotation marks.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Mr Black

    In most variants of English, we do not precede a first name (on its own) with "Mr/Mrs/Miss/Ms". They go before either just a surname or the first name/initial and surname together.

    Michael Black
    Mr Black
    Mr M Black
    Mr Michael Black
    Mr Michael
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Mr Black

    I know I'm going somewhat off-topic with this story, but it's at least partially about the topic of addressing people incorrectly.

    I attended a professional development training session today, where one of the trainers had a habit of calling everyone Mr. Joe, or Miss (never Mrs!) Jane.

    You sometimes hear a little of that in the southern US, but not around where I live, which is also where she was from.

    She also had several other annoying pronunciation habits - like pronouncing 'subtle' with a hard /b/, dropping the medial 't' from 'texts' (which came out as 'taxes') and 'author' with no 'th', but an added /r/ , yielding something like 'artur'. Unfortunately these words come up many times throughout the day.

    She also had bizarre and completely inappropriate syllabification on random words, both moving stress and removing syllables - 'predicament' became something like 'predi-CAMENT'

    Fortunately she was responsible for only about a third of the presentation. Unfortunately, her third was interspersed over several alternating segments. I think I made more notes about her pronunciation idiosyncrasies than I did on the material she presented, but comparing our notes made the carpool ride home pass quickly. My coworkers had also been distracted by her.

    We'll see what other doozies she produces during tomorrow's session.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #5

    Re: Mr Black

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    where I live, which is also where she was from.
    Wow! Do you mean she's a native English speaker?

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    #6

    Re: Mr Black

    I'll hazard a guess: she's from a different, traditionally disadvantaged ethnic group. My advice is to ignore the verbal differences which probably come from her being largely self-educated in much of her vocabulary.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Mr Black

    Were she noticeably any different from myself or the others in the room, her quirks wouldn't merit commenting. She's a native speaker, with the same accent. She told some story about her grandmother's farm a few towns over, so presumably she's as deeply rooted in the area as I am. She could easily be my aunt.

    I've known of her professionally for around 12 years, and she's notoriously scatterbrained and unorganized. This just happened to be the first time I'd had to listen to her for more than a few minutes at a time, so I hadn't noticed it before yesterday.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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