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Thread: loan out

  1. Banned
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    #1

    loan out

    Is this natural when talking about a player?

    We have to loan him out to a bush-league club for at least half a year, better one year, to get match practice. He's far away from being a candidate for the starting 11 or bench. Sitting on the terraces every weekend wouldn't bring any benefit for neither us nor him.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: loan out

    Did you write this yourself? I had to look up "bush league" because it's not used in BrE. It seems to be an AmE term, originating from baseball. As such, if you're talking about football (soccer) by using "starting 11", the term might not be understood by an audience familiar with soccer.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: loan out

    Yes, I wrote it myself and I'm talking about soccer. I don't know a better term. It means something like a low quality league.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: loan out

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    Is this natural when talking about a football/soccer player?

    We have to loan him out to a bush non-league/lower division club for at least half a year six months, better one year maybe even a whole season, to get match practice. He's far away from being a candidate nowhere near ready for the starting 11 or even the bench. Sitting on the terraces every weekend wouldn't bring any benefit for neither us nor or him.
    See above.

    To use "neither/nor" in the final sentence, you need to change "wouldn't" to "would" and remove "any":

    "Sitting on the terrace every weekend would bring benefits neither to us nor him."

    It's more natural to stick with "wouldn't" and "any" but use "either" and "or" as I have indicated above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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