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Thread: train accident

  1. Banned
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    #1

    train accident

    Please check if they're correct and which one is best.

    1 The deadly train accident article mentions no car or bike, therefore, assumably the victim went on foot.

    2 The deadly train accident article doesn't mention a car or bike, therefore, the victim probably went on foot.

    3 No car or bike was mentioned in the deadly train accident article which suggests that the victim was (or had been?) a walker.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: train accident

    "assumably" isn't a word. Perhaps you meant "presumably".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: train accident

    Yes, that's right.
    I'm wondering if "suggesting" in #3 would be better than "which suggests that"? Because of the "KISS" (keep it simple stupid) principle.

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    #4

    Re: train accident

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    The deadly train accident article
    This makes it sound as if it is the article that's deadly. We don't normally use 'deadly' of accidents involving cars, trains, planes, etc.

    The article on the fatal rail accident ...

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    #5

    Re: train accident

    How about this one?

    The absence of a car or bike in the article on the fatal rail accident points at a walker being the victim.

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    #6

    Re: train accident

    Quote Originally Posted by krisfromgermany View Post
    The absence of a car or bike in the article on the fatal rail accident points at a walker being the victim.
    The absence of any mention of a car or bike in the article on the fatal accident points to a pedestrian being the victim.

    A walker is normally somebody on a long walk in the country.

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    #7

    Re: train accident

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post


    A walker is normally somebody on a long walk in the country.
    In American English, a walker is a portable apparatus a person with severely impaired mobility uses to lean on while walking.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: train accident

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    In American English, a walker is a portable apparatus a person with severely impaired mobility uses to lean on while walking.
    I use my wife.

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    #9

    Re: train accident

    The article about the deadly train crash did not mention a car or bike, which suggests the victim was on foot.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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