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  1. Key Member
    Academic
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      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #1

    love for you to...


    1) I'd love you to come over for a visit.

    2) I'd love for you to come over for a visit.

    Is there any difference in the meanings of these sentences?

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: love for you to...

    I would use the first.

  3. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
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      • American English
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      • United States
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    #3

    Re: love for you to...

    Only the second sounds natural to my AmE ears. I think we've found another divide in our uncommon language.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
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    #4

    Re: love for you to...

    1 works best for me. We would also use "I'd love it if you came over for a visit".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. VIP Member
    English Teacher
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      • England
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    #5

    Re: love for you to...

    I think that there is a difference in use between them. However, I'm having difficulty putting my finger on quite what it is.

    Could it be to do with the likelihood of the event being realized (in the mind of the speaker)?

    I'd love for you to come over. (but I accept that may well not happen, for whatever reason)
    I'd love you to come over. (please do come over -- I'm inviting you)

    Just a suggestion.

  6. probus's Avatar
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    Retired English Teacher
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    #6

    Re: love for you to...

    Perhaps a universal bandage:

    I'd love it if you came over.

    But I have a worry that today's younger speakers might prefer to omit the "it".

  7. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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      • UK
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    #7

    Re: love for you to...

    And today's younger speakers may well grow into older people worried about what the next generation would use here.

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