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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    crackers and.biscuits

    Dear all,

    In terms of what I have seen in the supermarket, crackers are salty and biscuits are sweet. May I clarify it as it affects my writing.

    Many thanks.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Have a look at the information in the link below.

    http://www.differencebetween.info/di...s-and-crackers

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    #3

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    A biscuit is a different thing in British and American English. Be sure to use the right word for the dialect you're writing in.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    May I clarify it as it affects my writing.

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Ju:

    As it affects your writing, I wanted to bring something to your attention.

    I read the link carefully, but to the best of my knowledge, it did not mention something very important: The delicious "biscuits" shown in the link are called cookies in the United States.

    In this country, a "biscuit" is a "small round cake of bread." It is neither salty nor sweet. One may add butter/margarine or jam/jelly. American biscuits are often eaten with ham and eggs, a traditional American breakfast.

    You may wish to go to the "images" section of Google and type in "American biscuits." There are many excellent illustrations. (I do not know how to link. Sorry.)

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post

    In this country, a "biscuit" is a "small round cake of bread." It is neither salty nor sweet. One may add butter/margarine or jam/jelly.
    In the UK, that's a scone.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    American biscuits are often eaten with ham and eggs, a traditional American breakfast.
    That would certainly not work in the UK! Biscuits are sweet. People eat ham and eggs on toast, on crumpets or on muffins (the savoury kind, not the sweet kind).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    A popular breakfast in my neck of the woods is biscuits and gravy. To make biscuits, you add fat to flour, and bake it. To make gravy, you add flour to fat, and simmer it. I've left out a few minor details but that covers the essentials.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I am not a teacher.

  8. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #8

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    In terms of what I have seen in the supermarket, crackers are salty and biscuits are sweet. May I clarify it as it affects my writing.
    This would work in a British supermarket, where we don't eat biscuits and gravy.

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    #9

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the UK, that's a scone.
    A scone in the US is a slightly sweetened (AmE) biscuit, usually triangular in shape. They're not as sweet as a muffin, nor as moist, but they usually are slightly sweet, whereas a biscuit almost never is (unless you're using it as a shortbread for a fruit-based dessert.)

    Now the whole 'should cornbread be sweet' debate is an entirely separate argument that's raged for a hundred years or more.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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    #10

    Re: crackers and.biscuits

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    A biscuit is a different thing in British and American English. Be sure to use the right word for the dialect you're writing in.
    I am in need of teaching here. Long ago when I was in England a Brit asked me "Are cookies biscuits or cakes?" So I get that "cookies" is an AmE term. But I thought we all understood the meaning of biscuit. What is the dialect difference?

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