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  1. Key Member
    Academic
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      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,593
    #1

    Red face forgot to lock the door or to...

    1) He forgot to lock the door or turn on the alarm.

    Can't this sentence mean two things:

    a) He either forgot to lock the door or turn on the alarm. He did one, but not the other. He had to do both.
    b) He had to do one of those two things, but didn't do either. He had to lock the door or to turn on the alarm, but he forgot that. (This one would probably need a context.)


    Gratefully,
    Navi.


  2. Raymott's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Academic
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      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 25,245
    #2

    Re: forgot to lock the door or to...

    It means he didn't do either.
    For a), use a) or "He either forgot to lock the door or to turn on the alarm."

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