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    #1

    The car with the bank robbers drove off

    I am wondering if my sentence sounds natural. Is it correct to say "swerving through"?

    The car with the bank robbers drove off at breakneck speed, swerving through the traffic.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post

    The car with the (bank) robbers drove off at breakneck speed, swerving zigzagging through the traffic.
    .

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    #3

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    teechar,

    I only wondering why "swerving" could not be used in my sentence. I will be honest and tell you that I have not seen the word "swerve" often in the books I had read before, and I cannot remember I have ever used it before.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    You could say that they "swerved across the lanes" or "swerved between the other cars". Having said that, I had no problem with "swerved through the traffic".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. teechar's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    Quote Originally Posted by Bassim View Post
    teechar,

    I'm only wondering why "swerving" could not be used in my sentence. I will be honest and tell you that I have not seen the word "swerve" often used in the books I had read before, and I cannot remember I have ever used it before.
    "Swerve" is a common enough word. The reason I changed it above is that it (swerve) implies a one-off move/maneuver, whereas I suspect robbers in a stolen car are likely to be involved in multiple such moves.

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    #6

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    teechar,

    It is interesting that I wanted to ask you first if "swerve" implies a one-off move whereas "zigzagging" implies multiple moves, but I could not remember the phrase "one-off move". And now you answered that question as if you read my mind by telepathy.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    Maybe it's a BrE vs AmE difference. Here, it's perfectly possible to "swerve all over the road". That suggests multiple consecutive swerves.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: The car with the bank robbers drove off

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Maybe it's a BrE vs AmE difference. Here, it's perfectly possible to "swerve all over the road". That suggests multiple consecutive swerves.
    That's also natural in AmE.
    I am not a teacher.

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