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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Present perfect/present perfect continuous

    Hello

    In what situations is it posssible to use either present perfect or present perfect progressive interchangeably?

    For example: I have been learning English for seven years now. Would it be correct to use ''I have learnt'' instead? I think now suggests that the person is still learning English so using present perfect instead would be wrong.
    OR I have been teaching French for 10 years / I have taught French for 10 years. I have been living in london for 10 years or I have lived in london for 10 years. In my textbook I read that both forms can be used, but which of these forms suggest that the action started in the past continues in the present?(my textbook says nothing about that) If we remove for and leave; I have been teaching French or I have taught French, I have been living in London or I have lived in london, the sentences with present perfect progressive would have the meaning of lately, am I right?

    Thank you.





  2. VIP Member
    Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: Present perfect/present perfect continuous

    The differences are sometimes very subtle, and are not particularly significant.


    I have been learning English for seven years now. Would it be correct to use ''I have learnt'' instead? I think now suggests that the person is still learning English so using present perfect instead would be wrong.
    The non-progressive form is not incorrect, though the progressive form is more likely in the context of something that is still going on.


    I have been teaching French for 10 years / I have taught French for 10 years.
    I have been living in London for 10 years or I have lived in London for 10 years. In my textbook I read that both forms can be used
    Your book is right.

    which of these forms suggest that the action started in the past continues in the present?
    Both.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 09-Feb-2017 at 11:31. Reason: Fixed typo

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