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    #1

    grown fun - grand fun

    Yesterday I was seeing an old American movie released in 1957 and there is a conversation between a man and a woman.

    He doesn't say neither "big fun" nor "great fun", the sound in this excerpt is not very clear, but what the man says is either "grand fun" or "grown fun".

    This is the sentence: "Well, it was **** fun while it lasted"

    Which one (grand - grown) is idiomatic here?

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    #2

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    Grown is not possible. Grand sounds unnatural but perhaps it fits the character's speaking style. Can you link to the excerpt so we can listen to it?
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    #3

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    Of course, I can, GoesStation. Here it is:
    https://jumpshare.com/v/x8U2runZnei8iVxORjvs

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    #4

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    Quote Originally Posted by gamboler View Post
    Yesterday I was seeing watching an old American movie, released in 1957, and there is was a conversation between a man and a woman in it.

    He doesn't say neither "big fun" or "great fun", and the sound in this excerpt is not very clear, but what the man says is either "grand fun" or "grown fun".

    This is the sentence: "Well, it was **** fun while it lasted"

    Which one (grand - grown) is idiomatic here?
    .

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    #5

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    He definitely says "It was grand fun ...". There's in interesting lilt to his voice. I think he's Irish and that makes sense - my Irish friends use "grand" a lot to mean "great". What's the title of the film and can you tell us the name of the character that spoke that line?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    Quote Originally Posted by gamboler View Post
    Of course, I can, GoesStation. Here it is:
    https://jumpshare.com/v/x8U2runZnei8iVxORjvs
    The voice says Well, it was grand fun while it lasted. I think the actor was trying to produce an Irish accent, and the screenwriter used what was thought to be typically Irish vocabulary by Americans of the era.
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    #7

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    Thanks, teechar, I believe you, but look at this:
    "I was seeing a movie" 354,000 results in Google
    "I was watching a movie" 363,000 results in Google.
    That's 50% appproximately.

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    #8

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    The actor is John Lund, born in Rochester, NY.
    As far as I know, he is not of Irish ancestry. The movie is "Affair in Reno"
    His character is a New Yorker too.

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    #9

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    It doesn't matter if the actor is of Irish ancestry. Actors can put on accents relevant to the part they are playing. That's why I asked for the name of the character he played. According to IMDB, his character is called Bill Carter, which could indicate Irish ancestry (Carter is an Irish, Scottish and English surname and is believed to have Gaelic/Celtic origins). There are a lot of people with Irish ancestry in New York so just because he plays a New Yorker in the film, it doesn't mean that he doesn't have Irish ancestry. Does his accent sound the same throughout the film?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: grown fun - grand fun

    New York had a huge population of Irish immigrants in the early 20th century. You'll see that reflected in movies of the era, where New York cops are almost always portrayed as Irish. Private employers discriminated against immigrants, but the civil service generally didn't; once some Irish immigrants got hired into the force, they naturally suggested that their friends and relatives could find work there. You can see the same phenomenon at work today in some fields; large numbers of airport employees in many American cities with large Somali and Eritrean immigrant populations come from one of those groups.

    Attributes of the Irish accent persist in New York dialects of American English to this day -- and also in New Orleans-area accents.
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