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  1. YAMATO2201's Avatar
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    #1

    bandage your arm

    1) 'I'll have the nurse bandage your arm,' said the doctor.
    2) 'I'll have the nurse bandage your arm for you,' said the doctor.
    Which is correct? If both are correct, what's the difference?
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bandage your arm

    Both are correct.

    The addition of "for you" makes it less formal and suggests that the bandaging will benefit you.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: bandage your arm

    Number 2 can imply that you are capable of doing it yourself.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. YAMATO2201's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: bandage your arm

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Number 2 can imply that you are capable of doing it yourself.
    Are you saying there are cases in which "for" in #2 is close in meaning to "instead of"?
    Last edited by YAMATO2201; 14-Feb-2017 at 04:59. Reason: Fixed typo. Thanks, GS.
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

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    #5

    Re: bandage your arm

    Quote Originally Posted by YAMATO2201 View Post
    Are you saying there are cases in which "for" in #2 is close in meaning to "in stead of"?
    Yes, possibly. Write instead as a single word.
    I am not a teacher.

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