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Thread: selection

  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    selection

    Can I say this in English?
    1. For the selection of my desert the waitress will come to my table.
    2. The waitress will come to my table for the selection of my desert.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: selection

    Dessert. A desert is a different thing.

  3. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: selection

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Dessert. A desert is a different thing.
    Even with the above correction, those sentences still sound odd.

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    #4

    Re: selection

    Yes, they do.

    Are you talking to a fellow diner, Ungifted?

    If I was dining with a companion who'd never eaten at a restaurant before, after the main course (AE entrée) I'd say 'The waitress will come and take our dessert orders in a minute or two.'

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    #5

    Re: selection

    Although entree is a common (misappropriated from French) word for it, main course is an everyday word meaning the same thing in American English.

    I'm unclear about how Brits use the all-purpose food noun pudding, which my then sixteen-year-old son defined as "anything that isn't actually pudding" during a family trip to England. Would it be odd to use it in place of "dessert" in your sentence?
    I am not a teacher.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: selection

    When talking about the (usually) sweet course that comes at the end of a meal, pudding is the same as dessert in BrE. However, one can have a savoury pudding as a main course. It's like a pie but upside-down!

    These are images of a steak and kidney pudding, but these are images of a steak and kidney pie. They're made with different kinds of pastry, I think.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: selection

    Thanks. I'm used to hearing the word in British contexts when discussing the sweet course at the end of a meal, but it occurred to me I didn't know whether it would be natural for a waiter to ask what you'd like for pudding.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: selection

    It would be natural but not common. Most restaurant menus list "Desserts" so the waiter is far more likely to ask if you would like dessert and, having given you time to peruse the dessert menu, to then ask you what you would like for dessert.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: selection

    First a big thank to all of you!

    Let me have another try. What if I say it this way?
    1. When choosing my dessert the waitress will come to my table.
    2. When selecting my dessert the waitress will come to my table.

    Does that sound more natural?
    Last edited by Ungifted; 26-Feb-2017 at 20:05.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: selection

    You have misspelt "dess​ert" twice again. Please edit your post.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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