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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    ''I am a hard-working person who never foregoes and brings everything to perfection.'

    Is the sentence correct? I wonder, if I can replace ''give up'' with ''forego''. If not, how can I solve the problem?

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: ''I am a hard-working person who never foregoes and brings everything to perfecti

    Quote Originally Posted by indifferent View Post
    I am a hard-working, determined and meticulous person. who never foregoes and brings everything to perfection
    .

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: ''I am a hard-working person who never foregoes and brings everything to perfecti

    Note the correct spelling of forgo. The adjective foregone has an intervening e; the verb to forgo​ doesn't.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: ''I am a hard-working person who never foregoes and brings everything to perfecti

    Usage Note: The verb forgo, meaning "to abstain from, do without," has forego as an acceptable variant. Thus, one can forgo or forego dessert, though the spelling without the e is far more common and is preferred in most dictionaries. Forego also exists as a separate word meaning "to go before, either in place or time," as in The essential points have been laid out in the foregoing pages. The two words have historically been spelled differently because they incorporate different prefixes: The fore- of forego is the same prefix (meaning "in front, ahead, before") found in forefather, forehead, and foreword, while the for- of forgo is akin to the for- in forget, forlorn, and forsake and usually denotes loss or removal.

    https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=forego



    In your original sentence, you cannot use 'forgo' in place of 'give up, indifferent.

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