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    #1

    "Hardly in better shape"

    Hello, I am reading an article referring to Poland after WWII. I don't understand what this sentence means:
    As Poland emerged from World War II, it was hardly in better shape to become a homogeneous nation-state than it had been after World War I.

    My problem is the sentence: "it was hardly in better shape". I can't understand what that means.


    Could you please tell me in other words what all the sentence means?
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Do you have a link to the article?

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    #3

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Quote Originally Posted by captain1 View Post
    it was hardly in better shape
    It means Poland was not really in a much better condition.

    Take a look at meaning #1 in the link below.

    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/di...english/hardly

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    #4

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    I couldn't find a link
    The name of the article is:
    Changing Norms of Minority Rights and the Making of a Polish Nation-State










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    #5

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Please give this information in post #1 next time, captain.

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    #6

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Hello again, I have another question please regarding the same article.
    My question is about this paragraph:
    "The first homogenization strategy involved populating the territories with
    trustworthy Poles, such as military veterans, border guards, and Roman
    Catholic priests. The military nature of the program stems from the fact that
    as a matter of administration these regions were largely unguarded and susceptible
    to nationalist activism from the semi-autonomous Belarusian and
    Ukrainian socialist republics beyond the border."

    My question: Can you understand from this paragraph if the population "trustworthy Poles" are armed people - they are located there in order to defence with weapons, to provide security but not to live there.. or they are located there in order to live and not to defend?
    Thanks.
    Last edited by captain1; 26-Feb-2017 at 00:10. Reason: Changing 'defence' to defend

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    #7

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    To populate means to settle a population of ordinary people in a place, unless otherwise qualified. These would be unarmed people unless it's normal for people in the specified population to be armed.

    Note that defense ("defence" in BrE) is a noun. The verb is defend.
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    #8

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    To populate means to settle a population of ordinary people in a place, unless otherwise qualified. These would be unarmed people unless it's normal for people in the specified population to be armed.

    Note that defense ("defence" in BrE) is a noun. The verb is defend.
    Thank you.

    But in this paragraph we can see this: "military veterans, border guards"
    "The military nature of the program"

    Does It change what you wrote to me or you still think the same about this paragraph?
    Thanks.


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    #9

    Re: "Hardly in better shape"

    Quote Originally Posted by captain1 View Post
    Thank you.

    But in this paragraph we can see this: "military veterans, border guards"
    "The military nature of the program"

    Does It change what you wrote to me or you still think the same about this paragraph?
    The key word is trustworthy. The paragraph says the Polish government wanted a civilian population made up of people it could trust. The military nature of the program means that settling this civilian population in the region had a military objective as well as a civilian one. It's harder to defend a region populated by untrustworthy people.
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