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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Dripping from aside

    Context of another hard phrase to explain:

    - What do you do?
    - I teach Engllish.
    - How much do you earn?
    - X per month, but I'm also a football trainer to the kids from my school, and that's where I earn another X/10 per month.
    - Why do you bother with that peanuts?
    - Well, it's nice to have something dripping form aside.

    What phrase would you use for the green part?
    Last edited by lupicatulum; 01-Mar-2017 at 18:43.
    I'm not an English teacher. English is not my native language. Feel free to correct any sentence I write, regardless of the topic. It's a great way of learning and practicing English. Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Dripping from aside

    I guess you've translated an idiom from your own language. Can you describe in other words what "something dripping from aside" means here?
    I am not a teacher.

  3. Banned
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    #3

    Re: Dripping from aside

    You could say: Well, it's nice to make some extra money.

  4. Junior Member
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    #4

    Re: Dripping from aside

    Well, that's the problem, I don't know how to describe it.

    So, it's about the money. When having an income, but it's not your main income... It's just something that's pouring in your pocket from aside (from another small job, or some small criminal activity, or...). It's not a big money, it's not the money that you necessarily need, but it's nice to have something dripping from aside; you never know if you might need it sometimes. With that money you can buy things that you wouldn't if you wouldn't have it, but it won't help you if you loose your primary job.

    Or, lets say this. I'm a teacher, but I'm also a web designer (for real). On some websites I run Google Ads. It's not big money, maybe $20 per month, but it's nice to have something dripping from aside.
    I'm not an English teacher. English is not my native language. Feel free to correct any sentence I write, regardless of the topic. It's a great way of learning and practicing English. Thank you!

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Dripping from aside

    Extra income like that is sometimes called "pin money", going back to the days when women would take on tailoring work to add to the family income. Otherwise, I'd just say "It's a good way to make a little extra money".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: Dripping from aside

    You might say ​it's good to have a little something extra.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. Junior Member
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    #7

    Re: Dripping from aside

    Thank you all. I think "It's nice to have little something extra" is the best fit.

    Nobody's correcting me in this thread? I guess I'm just better and better...
    I'm not an English teacher. English is not my native language. Feel free to correct any sentence I write, regardless of the topic. It's a great way of learning and practicing English. Thank you!

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    #8

    Re: Dripping from aside

    Quote Originally Posted by lupicatulum View Post
    Thank you all. I think "It's nice to have a little something extra" is the best fit.

    Nobody's correcting me in this thread? I guess I'm just getting better and better....
    See above.

    My last correction is one more dot at the end. Three dots make an ellipsis, indicating that text has been left out. The fourth is required to end the sentence.
    I am not a teacher.

  9. teechar's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Dripping from aside

    Try:
    It's great to have a nice little earner on the side.
    https://www.collinsdictionary.com/di...-little-earner

    You might also want to learn/use the word "sideline"; e.g.,
    It's great to have a sideline like that.
    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...glish/sideline

  10. Junior Member
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    #10

    Re: Dripping from aside

    But I'm not GETTING better and better, I AM better and better.

    Just kiddin'....

    But I don't understand the fourth dot. I mean, I understand what you described, but...it has no sense....

    If I understood the rule correctly, is the sentece above correct? Three dots behind "but", but four dots at the end?
    I'm not an English teacher. English is not my native language. Feel free to correct any sentence I write, regardless of the topic. It's a great way of learning and practicing English. Thank you!

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