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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    Both words are from Dr. Seuss's ABC: Ten tired turtles on a tuttle-tuttle tree.

    I wonder if these two words rhyme with each other. I think they do, but not 100% sure.

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    #2

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    They're weak rhymes. The vowels are different: the first syllable of turtle rhymes with "third"; the first syllable of tuttle rhymes with "nut".
    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    I wouldn't describe them as rhymes at all. "Turtle" rhymes with "hurtle".

    As a general rule, Dr Seuss rhymes the last word of line 2 with the last word of line 4 of each verse.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I wouldn't describe them as rhymes at all. "Turtle" rhymes with "hurtle".

    As a general rule, Dr Seuss rhymes the last word of line 2 with the last word of line 4 of each verse.
    I misused the term "weak rhyme". According to this Wikipedia article, I meant either syllabic or forced rhyme. Dr. Seuss used this style of rhyming extensively.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    Not quite: one's a long vowel (turtle, /ɜ/), and the other's a short one (tuttle /ʌ/).

    You can feel the difference by emphasising them. On the long vowel, you emphasise the vowel itself. On the short, you emphasise the consonants around it.

  6. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #6

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    However, in a tongue twister like this, there's not much scope for emphasis, so the difference isn't that much when said at speed- it's there, though.

  7. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    In American English, turtle rhymes with fertile, girdle, myrtle, hurdle, and curdle.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #8

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    In BrE, it rhymes with all of those except "fertile". I don't do phonetic symbols but we pronounce that as "fir-tile"; it's two clear syllables, the second sounding exactly the same as the word "tile".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    In American English, turtle rhymes with fertile, girdle, myrtle, hurdle, and curdle.
    In British English, turtle (/'tɜ:t(ə)l//) rhymes with myrtle (/'mɜ:t(ə)l/) It does not rhyme with fertile (/'fɜːtaɪl/), girdle (/'gɜ:d(ə)l/), hurdle (/'hɜ:d(ə)l/) or curdle (/'cɜ:d(ə)l/).
    Last edited by Piscean; 05-Mar-2017 at 19:00.

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    #10

    Re: Does "Turtle rhyme with tuttle?

    Fair point. I didn't consider the "t" vs "d" difference between those.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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