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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Arrow I've got a bus stop round the corner and buses run every ten minutes.

    "People are always complaining about the bus service, but where I live it is good. I've got a bus stop round the corner and buses run every ten minutes."

    What does bold part mean?
    Does it mean 'There is a bus stop round corner'?, as I couldn't find any appropriate match for the 'have got' being used with transportation in any dictionaries.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I've got a bus stop round the corner and buses run every ten minutes.

    It's colloquial and informal but it means "There is a bus stop just round the corner from my house/flat".

    Jane: Are you enjoying living in your new house?
    Sue: Yes, it's great.
    Jane: Local facilities good?
    Sue: Not bad. I've got a supermarket just down the road, a swimming pool and gym about five minutes away, and three bus stops all within walking distance.
    Jane: No chemist?
    Sue: I've got one about a ten-minute drive away. It's OK.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: I've got a bus stop round the corner and buses run every ten minutes.

    I've got is a synonym for "I have" in the sense of possession. We nearly always choose "I've got", at least in AmE. As EMS notes, it's very common to say I've got or I have instead of "there is/are".

    Note that Americans and Canadians usually use gotten as the past participle of "to get", except in this idiom. It's wrong to say I've gotten ten dollars in my wallet.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I've got a bus stop round the corner and buses run every ten minutes.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I've got is a synonym for "I have" in the sense of possession. We nearly always choose "I've got", at least in AmE. . . .
    I think I swing both ways.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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