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    #1

    notably with nouns

    "The US and its allies in the region, notably South Korea and Japan, tend to focus on THAAD's defensive nature."


    In the above sentence from CNN Breaking News, why does the word "notably" ,which is an adverb, can be used to modify the noun?


    Is it kind of reduction from " which are notably South Korea and Japan"?

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    #2

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by lagoo View Post
    Is it kind of reduction from " which are notably South Korea and Japan"?
    I would say so, yes.

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    #3

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by lagoo View Post
    "The US and its allies in the region, notably South Korea and Japan, tend to focus on THAAD's defensive nature."


    In the above sentence from CNN Breaking News, why does can the word "notably", which is an adverb, can be used to modify the nouns?

    `

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    #4

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by lagoo View Post
    Is it a kind of reduction from of "which are notably South Korea and Japan"?
    No, I don't agree with that. Adverbs commonly modify noun phrases, which sometimes consist only of a single noun!

    Everybody was angry at the bus driver, especially Mary.

    Only you know the answer.

    Much of the growth underpinning Bali's healthy property market comes from domestic buyers, notably the wealthy players of Surabaya and Jakarta, says Rice.

    The last sentence is from theguardian.com website.

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    #5

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    No, I don't agree with that. Adverbs commonly modify noun phrases, which sometimes consist only of a single noun!

    Everybody was angry at the bus driver, especially Mary.

    Only you know the answer.

    Much of the growth underpinning Bali's healthy property market comes from domestic buyers, notably the wealthy players of Surabaya and Jakarta, says Rice.

    The last sentence is from theguardian.com website.
    Yes, these are commonly called 'focus' adverbs, and they can focus on things/nouns. This seems to be a quite different category of adverb, as I see it. It's debatable whether they can even be called adverbs at all. The above examples are quite different but I wonder if we could expand the first as:

    Everybody was angry at the bus driver, especially [angry was] Mary.

    where the adverb is modifying angry? I'm not completely convinced, but it's an interesting area of discussion.

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    #6

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    I wonder if we could expand the first as:

    Everybody was angry at the bus driver, especially [angry was] Mary.

    where the adverb is modifying angry? I'm not completely convinced, but it's an interesting area of discussion.
    I also considered that before writing my post above, but decided against it. I see "especially" as firmly attached to "Mary", not to "angry".

    Consider this variation of it:
    Not everybody was angry at the bus driver, only Mary.

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    #7

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    No, I don't agree with that. Adverbs commonly modify noun phrases, which sometimes consist only of a single noun!
    .
    That would appear to answer my reservations about 'otherwise' as an adverb in this thread.

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    #8

    Re: notably with nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    I see "especially" as firmly attached to "Mary", not to "angry".
    But what distinguishes Mary from the others but her anger?

    Consider this variation of it:
    Not everybody was angry at the bus driver, only Mary.
    I have no way at the moment of explaining this. I have a deeply-felt intuition that only is modifying be in some strange way, but can't find a way to justify this. Could it be that it is modifying an implied clause? As in:

    Not everybody was angry at the bus driver, only Mary [was angry].


    (For those with an interest: http://english.stackexchange.com/que...odifying-nouns)

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    #9

    Re: notably with nouns

    I actually meant to link this page, specifically about focus adverbs: http://english.stackexchange.com/que...rb-definitions

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    #10

    Re: notably with nouns

    It's good to see that we are not the only ones having problems with this.

    To go slightly off topic, I sometimes console myself by remembering that there are actually no such things as adverbs, nouns, prepositions, etc. These words are simply labels that we apply to groups of words that appear to be used in very similar ways. Individual writers on language group these words in ways that appear useful to them at the time of writing.

    When Bullokar published the first known grammar of English in 1586, he wrote of eight parts of speech: noun, pronoun, verb, participle, adverb, conjunction, preposition and interjection. By the time I started studying grammar, Wood (1954) had a very similar eight classes, though participles had become adjectives. Quirk et al (1985) had 12 word classes: preposition, pronoun, determiner, conjunction, modal verb, primary verb, noun, adjective, full verb, adverb, numeral and interjection plus 'a small number of words of a unique function (eg the negative particle not and the infinitive marker to) which do not fit easily into any of these classes'. Huddleston and Pullum (2002) had eight categories (they leave aside interjections): noun, verb, adjective, determinative, adverb, preposition, coordinator and subordinator. Their preposition class includes some words that were traditionally classed as adverbs or conjunctions. The most recent grammar on my bookshelves, Aarts (2011), has eight word classes: noun, verb, adjective, verb, preposition, adverb, conjunction and interjection. Like H & P, Aarts has an expanded preposition class.


    It's no wonder that we at UE can't always agree on which word class to put some words in.
    Last edited by teechar; 07-Mar-2017 at 22:56.

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