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Thread: She is a cook

  1. Banned
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    #1

    She is a cook

    Are they all correct?

    She is a cook and specialized in (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specialized with (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specializing in (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specializing with (baking) pizza.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: She is a cook

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    Are they all correct? ​No. None is correct.

    She is a cook and specialized in (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specialized with (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specializing in (baking) pizza.
    She is a cook and specializing with (baking) pizza.
    - Best: She is a cook who specializes in pizza.

    - Okay but not as natural: She is a cook specializing in pizza.

    It's fine but not necessary to add "baking" to both.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #3

    Re: She is a cook

    I think my 2nd and 4th sentences are wrong due to "with" but why are #1 and #3 also wrong?
    Would "specialized" work in a sentence about the past?
    For example, "She was a cook specialized in pizza"?

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    #4

    Re: She is a cook

    Simplest is often best: She is a pizza cook.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: She is a cook

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Simplest is often best: She is a pizza cook.
    Yes. Or pizza baker.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: She is a cook

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    I think my 2nd and 4th sentences are wrong due to "with" but why are #1 and #3 also wrong?
    Would "specialized" work in a sentence about the past?
    For example, "She was a cook specialized in pizza"?

    She is a cook and specialized in pizza.
    It's grammatical but means that although she still bakes, she has stopped specializing in pizza.

    She is a cook and specializing in pizza.
    Either add is or get rid of and:

    - She is a cook and is specializing in pizza.
    - She is a cook specializing in pizza.

    She was a cook specialized in pizza.
    Add who and you're there:

    - She was a cook who specialized in pizza.

    Are you working on using "specialize" in sentences? It's not really natural in your examples. If we were using a form of "special," Americans would usually say something like "She's a cook. Pizza is her specialty."

    (The British say speciality.)
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #7

    Re: She is a cook

    A person who makes pizzas in a pizzeria is a "pizzaiolo/pizzaiola".

    She's a pizzaiola.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: She is a cook

    We also use pizza chef.

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