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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Know somebody to be/do something

    Hello all,
    Is the bold context follow the italic blue pattern below?, as I don't know if preposition 'to' belong to verb 'trust' or 'know'.

    have information 1[transitive, intransitive] to have information in your mind as a result of experience or because you have learned or been told it
    know somebody/something to be/do somethingWe know her to be honest.

    http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/know_1?q=know



    "The managers did not know whom to trust."
    Last edited by nininaz; 13-Mar-2017 at 08:16.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    No, that's a different pattern. The verb know is often followed by a wh- infinitive clause.

    I don't know what to say.
    Do you know where to go?
    She knew exactly what to do.

    In all examples, in both patterns, to is part of a to-infinitive verb.

  3. nininaz's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    No, that's a different pattern. The verb know is often followed by a wh- infinitive clause.

    I don't know what to say.
    Do you know where to go?
    She knew exactly what to do.

    In all examples, in both patterns, to is part of a to-infinitive verb.
    Could you please tell me why we use 'whom' ? If that pattern is not correct , how do we know to put 'who' or 'whom'?

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Could you please tell me why we use 'whom' ?
    jutfrank already told you why below.
    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    The verb know is often followed by a wh- infinitive clause.
    I am not a teacher.

  5. nininaz's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    jutfrank already told you why below.
    You should read the rest of my sentence as well !!

    "If that pattern is not correct , how do we know to put 'who' or 'whom'?"

    I have no problem using 'WH' word, otherwise I want to know why we use 'whom' instead of 'who' .

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Because 'whom' is the object of 'to trust'.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. nininaz's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Because 'whom' is the object of 'to trust'.
    it is like:
    I don't know whom to meet tonight. (object - meet somebody)
    I don't knew who to answer the question.(subject - somebody answer the question)

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    I would say 'I don't know who will/should answer the question'.

    The following might be worth your reference.
    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/who-or-whom
    I am not a teacher.

  9. Piscean's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    I don't know whom to meet tonight. (object - meet somebody)
    I don't knew who to answer the question.(subject - somebody answer the question)

    The first is correct, but very formal in BrE. Most of us would use 'who'.

    The second does not work. You need to say "I don't know who will answer the question".

    The pattern with the infinitive works only if the subject is the same in both parts.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 13-Mar-2017 at 19:10.

  10. nininaz's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Know somebody to be/do something

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post

    The pattern with the infinitive works only if the subject is the same in both parts.
    Lots of thanks teacher. such a great tip. I didn't know about it before.

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