Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. Junior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 85
    #1

    "Doing" or "to do"

    Which is the better for each blank? Or both works? Thanks for your choice and your explanation for the below:
    1. He came all the way on such a rainy night, mainly ______ that everything was going on right.
    A. making sure B. to make sure
    PS: Here is my personal view: I don't think A works well here. But I feel confused with B. Because I was taught that a "to do" shouldn't be placed just behind a comma as a purpose.
    So, in this sentence, is the comma superfluous here?

    2. --Will the plan ____________ the libraries nationally be carried out in the coming year?
    --It all depends, I suppose.
    A. to promote B. promoting

  2. Key Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 4,988
    #2

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    I think "plan to promote something" sounds better than "plan promoting something", though both are used.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 8,175
    #3

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    I think 'making sure' is possible because it modifies the subject 'He'.
    I am not a teacher.

  4. Key Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 4,988
    #4

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think 'making sure' is possible because it modifies the subject 'He'.
    I think both are possible but it is a matter of which sounds better.

    He came to make sure...
    He came making sure...
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 8,725
    #5

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    Quote Originally Posted by tedmc View Post
    I think both are possible but it is a matter of which sounds better.

    He came to make sure...
    He came making sure...
    It's not really about which sounds better. They have different effects/meanings. "to make sure..." shows the purpose of his visit.

    Quote Originally Posted by xxwzs View Post
    I feel confused with B. Because I was taught that a "to do" shouldn't be placed just behind a comma as a purpose.
    So, in this sentence, is the comma superfluous here?
    I suggest you get rid of this idea. The comma is definitely not superfluous.

    In 2., to promote makes more sense to me after the plan since plans contain actions for the future. Using "The plan promoting..." is like saying The plan which promotes...

  6. Junior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 85
    #6

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    So, according to your explanation, A and B both function well in the below sentences, right? However, they have different effects/meanings. I mean, "to celebrate" shows the purpose why many citizens exotically dressed in themed costumes; and "celebrating" suggests what many citizens were doing when exotically dressed in themed costumes.
    1. Many citizens exotically dressed in themed costumes, ______ Halloween in New York City. (with a comma)
    2. Many citizens exotically dressed in themed costumes ______ Halloween in New York City. (without a comma)
    A. celebrating B. to celebrate

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 8,725
    #7

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    Yes, that's right.

    By the way, your sentence needs changing. Either remove the adverb exotically or place it after the verb dressed.

    Yes, if you use an infinitive of purpose (to celebrate), you don't really need a comma whereas if you use a present participle (celebrating), then the comma is necessary.

  8. Key Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Malaysia
      • Current Location:
      • Malaysia

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 4,988
    #8

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    It's not really about which sounds better. They have different effects/meanings. "to make sure..." shows the purpose of his visit.

    He came all the way on such a rainy night, mainly to make sure that everything was going on right.
    He came all the way on such a rainy night, mainly making sure that everything was going on right.

    I know that "to make" indicates something is "done with a purpose", while "making" denotes "which".

    But in the context of the sentences, I don't think there is a difference. He didn't stay at home making sure but he came all the way making sure, which implies that he came with a purpose.
    I am not a teacher or a native speaker.

  9. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 8,175
    #9

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    I think 'mainly' suggests 'making sure' is the purpose.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Key Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 4,832
    #10

    Re: "Doing" or "to do"

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think 'making sure' is possible because it modifies the subject 'He'.
    Good point. They mean two different things. "To make sure" tells us that was his reason for going there. "Making sure" just says that he did it while he was there without saying that that was his reason (or only reason) for going.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •