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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    fills me up / makes me full

    Hello

    Would you like some pizza?
    No, thank you. Pizza fills me up and I'd like to enjoy some dessert after dinner.

    1- In the dictionary definitions of "to fill somebody up", it says "...food that fills you up makes you feel as if you have eaten enough", so does this mean that we should only use "fill me up" when the type/amount of food is not usually satiating?
    OR
    Can I use the structure "fill me up" with any type/amount of food that usually makes me feel full?

    2- Does simply saying "makes me feel full /makes me full" sound natural?
    eg: Pizza makes me (feel) full.

    Thank you
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 15-Mar-2017 at 08:28. Reason: Removed boldface and standardised font

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fills me up / makes me full

    Quote Originally Posted by Eman Hassan View Post
    Hello

    Would you like some pizza?
    No, thank you. Pizza fills me up and I'd like to enjoy some dessert after dinner.

    1- In the dictionary definitions of "to fill somebody up", it says "...food that fills you up makes you feel as if you have eaten enough", so does this mean that we should only use "fill me up" when the type/amount of food is not usually satiating?

    No. Read the definition again. It means that the food IS filling. ("Satiating" is not natural or conversational.)


    OR
    Can I use the structure "fill me up" with any type/amount of food that usually makes me feel full?

    Yes. Again, read the definition.

    2- Does simply saying "makes me feel full /makes me full" sound natural?
    eg: Pizza makes me (feel) full.

    Yes, usually, though it depends on the context. In American English, it's more common to say that it fills you up.


    Thank you.
    You're welcome.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. Junior Member
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    #3

    Re: fills me up / makes me full

    Thank you.
    You see, the reason why I asked this question is because of the phrase "as if" in the definition (as if you've eaten enough), which implies that you haven't eaten enough. So, this is why I assumed that "fills me up" is only used when the amount or the type of food is not enough to make me feel full. But what you're saying is the amount or the type of food is not important, am I right?

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