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  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #1

    good boy/attaboy

    Hello.

    Before anything else I'd like to say that I've not seen you for a while and I've been missning this forum so much.
    Hopefully, I will never ever again leave this website for such a long time.

    My question is:

    Let's pretend I have a 2 year old kid (let's say he's male), I want to teach him English since his very childhood, so that he can become a bilingual. While walking around in the central park, I'm trying to make him pronounce an English word (I assume English-speaking parents in English-speaking countries normally do the same thing. With their kids they usually go like "Say "tree", come on, you can say that. "Tree". Just say it!"). After a while my son finally pronounces something remotely similar to the word I want to hear from him. What should I say in this case? I wholeheartedly believe that if I say "good boy" or -- what's much more weird -- "attaboy", it will sound like my son is a dog or something. How do you normally react in these situations? For sure I can say simply "good" or "well done" but I'm interested in other phrases that are appropriate in the aforementioned situation.

    Excuse me for a lenghty question. I hope you understand what I'm trying to say.
    Honestly, my only mission in life is to come closest to being American in terms of my language (at least). I'm not asking for anything else.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: good boy/attaboy

    'Good boy' is fine. 'Attaboy' is OK, too, but is mainly heard in American slang.

    Also: 'Well done'/'Good try'/'Great'/That's right'.

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
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    #3

    Re: good boy/attaboy

    For me, they're both good for dogs but good boy and good girl are very appropriate for young children too. I wouldn't use attaboy on a child.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: good boy/attaboy

    "Good job" works too.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: good boy/attaboy

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    Hello.

    Before anything else​, I'd like to say that I've not seen you for a while and I've been missning missing this forum so much.
    Hopefully, I will never ever again leave this website for such a long time.

    My question is:

    Let's pretend I have a 2 year old kid son; (let's say he's male) I want to teach him English since his very childhood from an early age so that he can become a bilingual. While walking around in the central park, I'm trying I try to make him pronounce say/use an English word (I assume English-speaking parents in English-speaking countries normally do the same thing). With their kids, they usually go say something like "Say "tree", come on, you can say that. "Tree". Just say it!"). After a while, my son finally pronounces says something remotely similar to the word I want to hear from him. What should I say in this case? I wholeheartedly believe that if I say "Good boy" or, what's much more weird, "Attaboy", it will sound like my son is a dog or something. How do you normally react in these situations? For sure Of course, I can say simply "Good" or "Well done" but I'm interested in other phrases that are appropriate in the aforementioned situation.

    Excuse me for a lenghty lengthy question. I hope you understand what I'm trying to say.
    Welcome back.

    Note my corrections above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
    Key Member
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    • Join Date: May 2015
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    #6

    Re: good boy/attaboy

    In regards to humans, I'm probably more likely to use 'attaboy/attagirl' with a close adult friend, than a younger child. I also tend to use it ironically, but not exclusively.
    Wear short sleeves! Support your right to bare arms!

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