Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Taiwan
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Jan 2007
    • Posts: 264
    #1

    get me started on those kids

    My 7 year old son was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder last year ...But he started falling behind significantly, to the point where classmates were calling him stupid. (Don't even get me stared on those kids.)

    Hi,
    What does the sentence in parenthesis mean? Thanks.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    Key Member
    Other
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 4,392
    #2

    Re: get me started on those kids

    Quote Originally Posted by LewisJian View Post
    My seven-year-old son was diagnosed with attention deficit disorder last year ...But he started falling behind significantly, to the point where classmates were calling him stupid. (Don't even get me started on those kids.)

    Hi,
    What does the sentence in parenthesis mean? Thanks.
    Hi, Lewis!

    It's informal American English. (Maybe British, too. I'll let one of them confirm or deny.)

    When we say "Don't get me started," it means that there is a lot we could say on the subject - more than you want to hear.

    To rearrange it a little: "If I get started talking about those classmates, I'll lose my temper and rant. So do me a favor and don't get me started. Trust me, you don't want to listen to what would say."

    The phrase "Don't even" is also tricky. It's highly idiomatic. Basically, it's a more forceful way of saying "don't." The parent could have said "Don't get me started," but chose "Don't even get me started" for added emphasis.

    Good question. I hope that helps.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,071
    #3

    Re: get me started on those kids

    Yes, it's British, too. And all other varieties of English, I assume.

  4. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,380
    #4

    Re: get me started on those kids

    Quote Originally Posted by LewisJian View Post
    What does the sentence in parentheses mean? Thanks.
    Note my correction above. The singular "parenthesis" refers to either "(" or ")". Its last syllable rhymes with "sit" and ends with an unvoiced s. The plural, whose last syllable sounds exactly like "ease", refers to more than one parenthesis.
    I am not a teacher.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] The tournament has started/has been started?
    By Aamir Tariq in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-Apr-2016, 09:20
  2. [Grammar] Started to rain or started raining
    By boon78 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Mar-2014, 14:07
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2013, 15:12
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Feb-2013, 06:29
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2012, 19:05

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •