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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    swap out his English keyboard.

    Swap out:To remove something and replace or exchange it:The program swapped out the contents of memory to make space for more data. I swapped the memory card out for a newer one.

    http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/swap+out

    Swap: Exchange or give (something) in exchange for
    http://www.wordwebonline.com/en/SWAP


    What is the difference betwen swap and swap out, meaning the above?

    Original: He decided to swap out his english keyboard for a french one and discovered that he couldn't login.

    Instead of the original can we say :He decided to swap his english keyboard for a french one and discovered that he couldn't login?

    Thank you.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    'Swap out' is unknown to me. I would use only 'swap'. 'English' and 'French' need initial capitals. I would make 'login' two words in that sentence.

  3. Key Member
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    #3

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    'Swap out' is unknown to me. I would use only 'swap'. 'English' and 'French' need initial capitals. I would make 'login' two words in that sentence.
    What do you mean by "English and French need initial capitals? My example sentences start with capital letters. Do you mean "I would change swap and swap out into login"?

    Thank you.

  4. VIP Member
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    #4

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    What do you mean by "English and French need initial capitals?
    Piscean means you should write English instead of english, and French instead of french. (I don't do this myself, but you should probably know the majority of users do.)

    I can't really get the intended meaning of swap out. I don't see what the out does. And in the example, how can a password be 'removed' before being replaced?

  5. VIP Member
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    #5

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    Piscean means you should write English instead of english, and French instead of french. (I don't do this myself, but you should probably know the majority of users do.)
    If by "majority" you mean "virtually every careful writer except Jutfrank" then I agree. Hht, you should always capitalize the initial letter of the name of a language. Not doing so makes your writing look careless to most readers and to approximately 100% of teachers. Although Jutfrank is a teacher, effectively 0% of English teachers accept english.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Maybe it's the part of the U.S. I live in, but "swap it out" sounds perfectly normal (though not MORE correct than simply "swap").
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. VIP Member
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    #7

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    If by "majority" you mean "virtually every careful writer except Jutfrank" then I agree. Hht, you should always capitalize the initial letter of the name of a language. Not doing so makes your writing look careless to most readers and to approximately 100% of teachers. Although Jutfrank is a teacher, effectively 0% of English teachers accept english.
    No, no! I always capitalise the name of a language, and nationalities, too! It's only in cases where the word acts as a descriptive adjective, where I don't. (Okay, I admit that the example with the keyboards is arguable.) And I'm really not the only one. It was a copy-editor colleague that gave me the idea for this style in the first place.

    In my defence, these cases are infrequent enough that in my job as a teacher, this is rarely an issue. It's only when I'm proofing (I've worked for many years as a proofreader, across various text types) that I ever even have to deal with this issue. And sometimes on this forum, which although I feel is an appropriate platform to discuss the reasons behind this alternative style choice, seems to be vehemently opposed without ever really justifying why.

  8. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    . . . I can't really get the intended meaning of swap out. I don't see what the out does. It changes the meaning.

    And in the example, how can a password be 'removed' before being replaced? It's just semantics. When you replace it with a new one you're automatically removing the old one.
    It means exactly what the original post quote says it means: to replace - usually a part. When my guitar amps' tubes wear out I swap them out for fresh ones.

    Swap just means trade. Swap out means replace.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #9

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    In the UK, we would just swap them.

  10. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #10

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    The program swapped out the contents of memory to make space for more data.
    Computers have swap files, which are used to extend the RAM memory available, so this has a specific meaning: http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/swap+out

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