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  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    In the UK, we would just swap them.
    Here that would usually mean that you and someone else traded them.

    And don't get me started on credit default swaps . . . .
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  2. Moderator
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    #12

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    If by "majority" you mean "virtually every careful writer except Jutfrank" then I agree. Hht, you should always capitalize the initial letter of the name of a language. Not doing so makes your writing look careless to most readers and to approximately 100% of teachers. Although Jutfrank is a teacher, effectively 0% of English teachers accept english.
    I'll extend my admonition. You should always capitalize the initial letter of the name of a language or country regardless of whether it's used as a noun or an adjective. I could be wrong, but I doubt any important style guide says otherwise.

    Mind you, there are cases where a noun or adjective that's derived from the name of a country isn't capitalized. We may eat off of fine china or write with india ink, for example. In these terms, the derived word no longer refers to the country whose name it descended from.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #13

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Here that would usually mean that you and someone else traded them.

    And don't get me started on credit default swaps . . . .
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Maybe it's the part of the U.S. I live in, but "swap it out" sounds perfectly normal (though not MORE correct than simply "swap").
    But you two are from the States but one of you says "swap out is not more correct than simply "swap" and the other says "it is completely different, swap meaning trade and swap out meaning replacing."

    Thank you.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #14

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    But you two are from the States but one of you says "swap out is not more correct than simply "swap" and the other says "it is completely different, swap meaning trade and swap out meaning replacing."

    Thank you.
    I understand your confusion. To be exact: Swap usually means trade. Swap out always means replace.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  5. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    I'll extend my admonition. You should always capitalize the initial letter of the name of a language or country regardless of whether it's used as a noun or an adjective. I could be wrong, but I doubt any important style guide says otherwise.
    An adjective can be a name? Okay, I'll consider myself admonished.

  6. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    An adjective can be a name? Okay, I'll consider myself admonished.
    Sure. French fries. Danish pastries. English muffins. Russian dressing. German potato salad. Italian ices. Canadian bacon. Swiss cheese.

    Now excuse me while I head for the refrigerator. My stomach is starting to growl for some reason. . . .
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  7. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #17

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Sure. French fries. Danish pastries. English muffins. Russian dressing. German potato salad. Italian ices. Canadian bacon. Swiss cheese.
    Please point out the names. Names of what?! Languages?

    All you have listed here is different food items. The adjectives used when referring to food like this may refer to the kind/shape of the thing, the place of origin, a particular recipe, the process of making, etc. There are no names here. Linguistically speaking, these are simple noun phrases.

    Is it possible we're arguing over what counts as a name? Although there is a relationship between names and nouns, they are not identical. In some languages, there exists only one word to cover both concepts (nom in French, nombre in Spanish), but the difference is clearer in English. When we say "I fancy a muffin", 'muffin' is not the name of the thing, but simply a word that refers to the thing.

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    #18

    Re: swap out his English keyboard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    I understand your confusion. To be exact: Swap usually means trade. Swap out always means replace.

    Isn't there any second meaning other than replace?

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