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    #1

    lightweight

    Is it correct to use the noun "lightweight" to mean "a person who gets drunk easily"?

    He gets drunk easily. --> He's a lightweight.

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    #2

    Re: lightweight

    No.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: lightweight

    In the right context, yes!

    James - I went to the pub last night and I was really tipsy after just one glass of wine.
    Sarah - Lightweight!
    James - I know! It's terrible. The older I get, the less I can drink.
    Sarah - Ah well, at least you're a cheap date.

    We use "lightweight" in many contexts to indicate that we think someone should be able to do/eat/drink more than they have said they can. For example, I'm going out for a friend's birthday next weekend and we're going to a great pizza place. They serve amazing 12" (12-inch) pizzas with loads of toppings. One of the attendees said to me the other day "I might have to see if they do anything else on the menu. There's no way I can eat a 12-inch pizza on my own". My response to her was "Lightweight!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: lightweight

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    In the right context, yes! . . .

    We use "lightweight" in many contexts to indicate that we think someone should be able to do/eat/drink more than they have said they can. . . .
    Right. A lightweight is also someone who genuinely can't keep up with you:

    - He put down the hash pipe after just one hit. What a lightweight!

    - She only reads magazines like
    People and Soap Opera Digest. She's such a lightweight.

    - He's talking about trying out for the marathon, but he can only run ten miles. He's too much of a lightweight to qualify.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: lightweight

    No.

    A lightweight is someone who lacks clout.

    I know that I am defining one difficult term with another.

    If you have clout you have power and influence. Many people will listen to your opinions and have respect for them.

    If you lack clout, you are a lightweight. People will not listen to and have respect for your opinions. That is what it means to be a lightweight.

    Like me.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: lightweight

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    No.

    A lightweight is someone who lacks clout. . . .
    Yes, absolutely, that's one definition. All the others above are good, too.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #7

    Re: lightweight

    Yes, in context.

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