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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Question [Collocation] embark on

    Do you think "embark on" is OK to be used with "an idea"?

    embark on an idea?

    I can't find it in American Corpus nor in the dictionary.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    Please give us a full sentence to consider.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Junior Member
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    #3

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    The Food Standards Agency in the United Kingdom has _____ an idea called traffic light labeling.
    (A) embarked on (B) sought out (C) come up with (D) run out of

    The original text uses "come up with." My colleague argues that (A) may also be a correct option since it means "start."

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    It doesn't collocate naturally with idea to me.

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    #5

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    You can do lots of things with an idea - develop it, explore it, consider it, or reject it, for example. You cannot embark on one.
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    Normally "to embark on something" means "to start/launch/begin something". You can find lots of examples on the Internet. I mean if I were you, I'd embark on a journey to find those examples.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    In BrE, it's [more] common to hear/use "to embark upon​".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    Quote Originally Posted by simile View Post
    The Food Standards Agency in the United Kingdom has _____ an idea called traffic light labeling.
    (A) embarked on (B) sought out (C) come up with (D) run out of

    The original text uses "come up with." My colleague argues that (A) may also be a correct option since it means "start."
    Please note that this should have been post #1, simile.

  9. VIP Member
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    #9

    Re: [Collocation] embark on

    Quote Originally Posted by simile View Post
    My colleague argues that (A) may also be a correct option since it means "start."
    'started an idea' is equally bad.

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