Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Feb 2017
    • Posts: 235
    #1

    plural form of nouns

    Does the plural form of nouns derived from other languages always end with -s?
    For example:
    zeitgeists
    mustards
    ubermenschs
    tonneaus
    kirschwassers
    poltergeists
    volkswagens
    symbolisms
    raumdeuters
    gemutlichkeits
    stratospheres
    cadeaus
    Last edited by AirbusA321; 19-Mar-2017 at 18:59.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,371
    #2

    Re: plural form of nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    Does the plural form of nouns derived from other languages always end with -s?
    For example:
    zeitgeists This is uncountable
    mustards (though it's usually used uncountably)
    ubermenschs When it's used, it's "ubermenschen".
    tonneaus
    kirschwassers
    poltergeists
    Volkswagens
    symbolisms This is uncountable.
    raumdeuters
    gemutlichkeits
    stratospheres
    cadeaus
    I have marked several in red because I have never heard them used in English so there is no answer to your question. I have marked the others as correct or incorrect and given some comments.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,024
    #3

    Re: plural form of nouns

    That's an odd mix of words. Too diverse a mix to give you a rule, I'd say. What do you mean exactly by "derived from other languages"? Some of those words are English words, some are loanwords, and some are just foreign words.

  4. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Feb 2017
    • Posts: 235
    #4

    Re: plural form of nouns

    All these words are French or German, at least in the singular form, and they appear in the wikipedia list of English words derived from other languages

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonneau_(disambiguation)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gem%C3%BCtlichkeit
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirsch

  5. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Mar 2016
    • Posts: 774
    #5

    Re: plural form of nouns

    "mustard", "symbolism", and "stratosphere" are English words.
    Translator, editor and TESOL certificate holder, but not a teacher. Native speaker of American English (West Coast)

  6. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,335
    #6

    Re: plural form of nouns

    The majority of words on the list are German.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,024
    #7

    Re: plural form of nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    All these words are French or German, at least in the singular form, and they appear in the wikipedia list of English words derived from other languages

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonneau_(disambiguation)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gem%C3%BCtlichkeit
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirsch
    The three words you list are not really 'derived' from other languages if by 'derived', you mean 'based on' or 'adapted from'. These words have been borrowed directly from French and German, and they exist in the same form. In linguistics, they are known as loanwords. In pluralisation, they may follow the rules of the language they are borrowed from (if there is a reason the '-s' rule does not work), but otherwise they follow normal English patterns.

    The word mustard could be said to have derived from Old French, but is considered as a regular English word, not a loanword.
    The word stratosphere is an English word consisting of Greek roots. It is not a Greek word nor a loanword.

  8. Banned
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Belgium
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines

    • Join Date: Feb 2017
    • Posts: 235
    #8

    Re: plural form of nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by bubbha View Post
    "mustard", "symbolism", and "stratosphere" are English words.
    Yes but they are French words in the first place. They were exported to England maybe 1000 years or so ago.
    "la moutarde", "le symbolisme", "la stratosphère"

  9. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,335
    #9

    Re: plural form of nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    Yes but they are French words in the first place. They were exported to England maybe 1000 years or so ago.
    "la moutarde", "le symbolisme", "la stratosphère"
    "Mustard" is an old word, but "symbolism" and "stratosphere" have nineteenth- and twentieth-century roots. All three are English words.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 6,024
    #10

    Re: plural form of nouns

    Quote Originally Posted by AirbusA321 View Post
    Yes but they are French words in the first place. They were exported to England maybe 1000 years or so ago.
    No, that's not true.

    "la moutarde", "le symbolisme", "la stratosphère"
    These are French words.

    The reason why mustard and moutarde look similar, (but not identical) is because they share their etymologies. They both derive from Old French. A significant proportion of modern English words come from Old French, and a much higher proportion still of modern French words.

Similar Threads

  1. Singular nouns only in form.
    By man of manners in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 23-Aug-2016, 08:03
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 23-Feb-2013, 18:05
  3. [Grammar] When to use plural form and singular form
    By Andy Yang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Feb-2012, 13:18
  4. Plural Nouns after Plural Possessives
    By sarahmacalalad in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Jul-2011, 10:50
  5. Possessive Form of Nouns
    By iamwkk in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Jan-2006, 06:38

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •