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  1. Member
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    #1

    treachery

    What is the difference between these terms? I added my assumptions but I'm not quite sure.
    treachery - mainly used in politics and business
    treason - mainly used in politics and business
    betrayal - mainly used concerning personal affairs
    backstabbing - figurative, can be used for different purposes
    bewrayment - not so common, maybe outdated?
    perfidiousness
    Last edited by AirbusA321; 20-Mar-2017 at 19:12.

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    #2

    Re: treachery

    I had to Google "bewrayment". That word does not exist in modern English. I've read extensively and had never seen it before your post.

    "Perfidiousness" may show up occasionally in journalistic commentary. "Treachery" could appear in a number of contexts. "Treason" is really only a legal term for the name of a serious crime - a capital crime in the United States - which is clearly defined. It gets tossed around quite a lot in politically tumultuous times.

    I don't think I could support any of your characterizations of these words. Words are used in all kinds of contexts, often far beyond their original applications.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. Member
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    #3

    Re: treachery

    Which of these adjectives fits best to describe that e.g. a good old friend of yours takes away your girlfriend while you're absent?
    backstabbing
    treacherous
    traitorous

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: treachery

    It depends on how strongly you feel about your old friend, your girlfriend, and how old-fashioned you are in your choice of words. That said, I don't think that many, even of my geriatric generation, would use any of those words.

    Please don't ask me what words I would use. Most of them are unprintable.

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