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Thread: Out and out

  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Out and out

    Hi,

    Is "She's British out and out" correct?

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    #2

    Re: Out and out

    I understand it to mean she's fully British, in some way. More context could signal in which way.

  3. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #3

    Re: Out and out

    Through and through would work better there for me.

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Out and out

    It's usually used as an attributive adjective.

    He's an out-and-out Republican.

    What we were told were out-and-out lies!

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    #5

    Re: Out and out

    What about "He's an out and out British"?

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    #6

    Re: Out and out

    Quote Originally Posted by Untaught88 View Post
    What about "He's an out and out British"?
    No. Individuals can't be described as "a British".

    Out-and-out is an intensifier usually used for negative statements: ​he's an out-an-out fraud.
    I am not a teacher.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Out and out

    No. You might be able to get away with it if you removed the indefinite article but it's really not natural, even if the meaning is clear.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: Out and out

    The phrase you need is the one suggested in post #3:

    She's British through and through.

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