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  1. Junior Member
    Interested in Language
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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Aug 2016
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    #1

    Some meanings of the words "carriage" and "coach".

    Hello. I have another question and think it rather interesting one.
    The words "carriage" and "coach".
    If we are talking about trains, is there any difference between them? I know that American speakers prefer using the word "car" for it. Also "coach" in American English means the cheapest seats on a plane or train.


    And one more question.
    If we are talking about vehicle widely used in the past, what is the difference between these two words?
    I think "carriage" is more broad term for any wheeled vehicle which carrying persons by horses. "Coach" in my mind, is larger vehicle for the same purpose.
    So, I hope you'll help me with it.


    Regards.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
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      • British English
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      • UK
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    #2

    Re: Some meanings of the words "carriage" and "coach".

    On trains, in BrE, they are carriages.

    A carriage, in its other sense, is definitely a vehicle pulled by horses. A coach is similar to a bus but for longer journeys (in the UK).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
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      • American English
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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #3

    Re: Some meanings of the words "carriage" and "coach".

    A carriage would be open, while a coach is closed. Has a roof and place to sit down inside for the passengers.

  4. jutfrank's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
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      • England
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    • Join Date: Mar 2014
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    #4

    Re: Some meanings of the words "carriage" and "coach".

    In Britain, train companies use the word coaches, not carriages.

    Passengers tend to use carriage, not coach.

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