Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 2,073
    #1

    All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    " All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa one step above him on the bed, he had been tormented by images of his guest’s martyred limbs, and the realization of his own inadequacy."

    I cannot understand how this sentence be formed. Should not it be stretching on the floor, instead of stretched on the floor?
    Is the a inverse sentence?https://books.google.com.tr/books?id...equacy&f=false

    Thank you.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    Moderator
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 47,867
    #2

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    No. He wasn't "stretching" (which suggests movement), he was "stretched/stretched out", indicating a stationary position but one in which his body was extended to its full length.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 2,073
    #3

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. He wasn't "stretching" (which suggests movement), he was "stretched/stretched out", indicating a stationary position but one in which his body was extended to its full length.
    But I cannot understand the sentence's structure? Why isn't there a subject before the verb stretch?

    Thank you.

  4. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 2,073
    #4

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    It seems that grammatically it is a complex or a complex-compound sentence, so can I divide it simple to understand parts as in this: All through his night’s vigil, he had stretched on the floor with Issa one step above him on the bed. He had been tormented by images of his guest’s martyred limbs, and the realization of his own inadequacy.

    Thank you.

  5. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,638
    #5

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    But I cannot understand the sentence's structure? Why isn't there a subject before the verb stretch?
    The clause beginning "stretched on the floor" is, I believe, an adjective phrase modifying the subject, "he".
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 2,073
    #6

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. He wasn't "stretching" (which suggests movement), he was "stretched/stretched out", indicating a stationary position but one in which his body was extended to its full length.
    I do not know their grammatic name of their class but I think stretch is one of them and I think that they do not refer to any movement. To wait, to lie, to sleep are one of this class in addition to stretch. Example:"He was lying dead" do not refer to movement.

    Thank you.

  7. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 12,638
    #7

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    The verb stretch suggests movement. The adjective "stretched" does not.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 64,221
    #8

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Opening thread after a request.

  9. Key Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Turkish
      • Home Country:
      • Turkey
      • Current Location:
      • Turkey

    • Join Date: Jun 2016
    • Posts: 2,073
    #9

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. He wasn't "stretching" (which suggests movement), he was "stretched/stretched out", indicating a stationary position but one in which his body was extended to its full length.
    Can we say that for some verbs such as stretcht, the past participles are introduces immobilities, where as the present participles introduces motions?
    Thank you.

  10. YAMATO2201's Avatar
    Senior Member
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2016
    • Posts: 519
    #10

    Re: All through his night’s vigil, stretched on the floor with Issa

    Quote Originally Posted by hhtt21 View Post
    Can we say that for some verbs such as stretcht, the past participles are introduces immobilities, where as the present participles introduces motions?
    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJ View Post
    a) The baseball catcher stretched for the wild pitch and caught it. (not an immobility)
    The "stretched" in that sentence is not a past participle.
    I am not a teacher. I am currently studying basic English grammar.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Similar Threads

  1. stretched
    By unpakwon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Dec-2011, 03:39
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2009, 22:56
  3. stretched silhouette
    By njt2009 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Jun-2009, 01:58
  4. stretched thin
    By Yankees Fan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Aug-2008, 11:48
  5. Stretch / Stretched
    By jack in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2005, 13:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •