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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    untried footballer

    Which of the following sentence can convey the idea best and which of them is the most natural?

    I want the word convey the idea which expresses that the footballer haven't played in much game or in important games.

    1. "He is a good footballer but he is still untried."
    2. "
    He is a good footballer but he is still unseasoned."
    3. "
    He is a good footballer but he is still untested."
    4. "
    He is a good footballer but he is still young."

    I think young is a figurative way of expressing this idea but it could be confussed by age inspite of this kind of footballer almost always be young.

    And do you have any better alternatives?

    Thank you.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: untried footballer

    Number 3 looks best to me. Is "footballer" a common way to describe a football player?

    "Young" and "untested" do not mean the same thing. A young player may already have quite a lot of experience.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: untried footballer

    "Footballer" is absolutely fine in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: untried footballer

    You could also say that he is still green.

  5. VIP Member
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    #5

    Re: untried footballer

    inexperienced is the normal word for this.

  6. Key Member
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    #6

    Re: untried footballer

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    Number 3 looks best to me. Is "footballer" a common way to describe a football player?

    "Young" and "untested" do not mean the same thing. A young player may already have quite a lot of experience.
    But I have mentioned this situation as it probably might be a figurative way because as you have mentioned a young player may have a lot of experience or conversely an old player may not have a lot of experience.

    Thank you.

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    #7

    Re: untried footballer

    You can say a young player. It just won't convey exactly the same message to the reader as an inexperienced player​ would.
    I am not a teacher.

  8. Key Member
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    #8

    Re: untried footballer

    Quote Originally Posted by GoesStation View Post
    You can say a young player. It just won't convey exactly the same message to the reader as an inexperienced player​ would.
    Look at #5 http://www.wordwebonline.com/search.pl?w=young. Do you think it is wrong?

    Thank you.

  9. VIP Member
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    #9

    Re: untried footballer

    To me, a young player​ means a player who is not very old. Definition #5 seems like an archaic usage to me.
    I am not a teacher.

  10. teechar's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: untried footballer

    In that sense, "young hand" works as a unit (the two words together) to mean inexperienced.
    I'm more familiar with the opposite, "old hand."

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/old_hand

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