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Thread: Skip

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    #1

    Skip

    It is claimed that breakfast helps us lose weight, and that skipping it can raise our risk of obesity.


    1.Is "skipping" here a noun? or "skipping it = skipping breakfast"?


    2.Can I say "......, and that skipping can our risk of obesity."? Treat "skipping" as a noun here?
    Last edited by Maybo; 07-Apr-2017 at 10:14.
    If I make any mistakes in English, please let me know! Please! Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: Skip

    1. 'Skipping' here is a participle and 'skipping it' means 'not having it (breakfast)'.

    2. 'Skipping here is a gerund - acting as a noun - which is the strenuous activity of jumping over a twirling rope, which can actually reduce our risk of obesity.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 07-Apr-2017 at 15:53. Reason: Fixed typo

  3. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Skip

    skipping it = skipping breakfast = the subject of the clause = a gerund noun

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