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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    Hello all users!


    There is a man in our office who behaves as if he were a real commando. Whenever it rains early in the morning, I quickly change into my dry set of clothes. Each time it rains or buckets with rain, he comes to the office dripping wet early in the morning, saying: "Listen. I am not afraid to sit all eight hours, wet to the skin. When I come to think of it, water was created for mankind, so why would it do any harm to me?". That's what his philosophy is all about. Besides, his immune system is very good at scaring off all kinds of kinds of throat illnesses.


    Now I would like to say how he reacts to all sorts of bad weather, especially rain.


    All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle.


    He is unaffected by the weather.


    What do you think of the sentence in question?


    Thank you.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post

    All he does might ever do is sneeze over his shoulder; and he's always as fit as fiddle.
    .

  3. Key Member
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    #3

    Re: All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    I understand "sneeze over his shoulder" to mean "shrug off" or "treat as something unimportant". Is "sneeze over his shoulder" often encountered in everyday speech?

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    Given the context, I assumed it was meant in its literal sense.

  5. Key Member
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    #5

    Re: All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    Yes, it may apply literally to this colleague of mine. I know for a fact that he only took 4 days off from work during all his career because of some sort of a common cold or runny nose. He has worked for more than 35 years now.

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    #6

    Re: All he does is sneeze over his shoulder and he is as fit as fiddle

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    I understand "sneeze over his shoulder" to mean "shrug off" or "treat as something unimportant". Is "sneeze over his shoulder" often encountered in everyday speech?
    I don't think I've ever heard or seen it before now.
    I am not a teacher.

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