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  1. Key Member
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    #1

    reigning heavyweight champion

    "Melik Oktay is reigning heavyweight champion and this year’s captain of the Turkish Tigers Sports Association."

    What does "reigning heavyweight champion" means. Question is about reigning because I know following part.

    to be the best or most powerful
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/reigning

    I cannot connect the sentence with the definition in the link. Would you please help?

    https://books.google.com.tr/books?id...ation.&f=false

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    It means Melik is the current champion.

    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewg927 View Post
    It means Melik is the current champion.

    I am not a teacher.
    But why does the link not express current? Do current events=reigning events and current news=reigning news?

    Thank you.

  4. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    reigning champion sounds better than current champion. It has more of a magesterial feel.

    to reign means something like to be dominant. A champion is dominant like a king or queen.

    reigning events doesn't make sense.

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    #5

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    reigning champion sounds better than current champion. It has more of a magesterial feel. A champion is like a king or queen.

    reigning events doesn't make sense.
    Then can we say that reigning has a special nuance than current and is used for special cases such as champions? Can we say that Leicester City is the reigning champion of the Premier League?

    Thank you.

  6. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    When these words are used as adjectives before champion, they effectively have the same meaning, yes.

    Yes, Leicester are the reigning champions.

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    #7

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    hhtt, many of your posts seem to suggest that you believe that all words can have a meaning that fits exactly one of the definitions given in the dictionary or dictionaries that you happen to be using. This is rarely the case. When constructing their definitions, lexicographers do their best to give people who use the dictionary as good an idea as possible of the message writers are trying to convey when they use a particular word.

    Most words in English (and in all the other languages that I know) have an almost infinite range of subtle meanings. I use the same word, 'table' for the 55cm square, 45cm high piece of furniture in my living room and the 120cm square, 78 cm high, piece of furniture in my dining room. The former is made of plastic, and is white. The latter is made of wood, and is brown (and has drop-down sides). I suppose that an incredibly large dictionary might have a list of definitions of 'table' with separate entries for my different tables, the round table, or the massive table at Furzey Gardens. The subtle (or sometimes not so subtle) differences are often irrelevant.

    When you ask, as you often do, a variation on "Which of the definitions I have found is the appropriate one?" the best answer is often "All/some of them". The borderlines between different definitions are often artificial/blurred. Try looking up the meaning of any word you care to think of in a dozen or so dictionaries at www.onelook.com, and see how some of them use different words in their definitions.

    You would probably do better to look at a few of the examples of the word in use given at fraze.it to get an idea of how the word is used than trying to shoe-horn examples you find into the definitions given in one or two dictionaries.
    Last edited by Piscean; 11-Apr-2017 at 10:12. Reason: link added

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    #8

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    Excellent, Piscean. I've bookmarked that post to quote in the future.

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    #9

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    Most words in English (and in all the other languages that I know) have an almost infinite range of subtle meanings. I use the same word, 'table' for the 55cm square, 45cm high piece of furniture in my living room and the 120cm square, 78 cm high, piece of furniture in my dining room. The former is made of plastic, and is white. The latter is made of wood, and is brown (and has drop-down sides). I suppose that an incredibly large dictionary might have a list of definitions of 'table' with separate entries for my different tables, the round table, or the massive table at Furzey Gardens. The subtle (or sometimes not so subtle) differences are often irrelevant. .
    Yes, in your table example the difference is irrelevant but I think the difference is worthy of think when thinking current and reigning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    When you ask, as you often do, a variation on "Which of the definitions I have found is the appropriate one?" the best answer is often "All/some of them". The borderlines between different definitions are often artificial/blurred. Try looking up the meaning of any word you care to think of in a dozen or so dictionaries at www.onelook.com, and see how some of them use different words in their definitions.

    You would probably do better to look at a few of the examples of the word in use given at fraze.it to get an idea of how the word is used than trying to shoe-horn examples you find into the definitions given in one or two dictionaries.
    I think I cannot get the difference as Jutfrank explained in #4 when I look www.onelook.com or fraze.it because it seems that these are based on experience and and experienced person can explain these properly.

    Thank you.

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    #10

    Re: reigning heavyweight champion

    "Current" and "reigning" are not interchangeable so you can't say "a reigning event". Perhaps, it may be helpful if you just memorize the phrase "reigning champion" since we use it a lot.

    I am not a teacher.

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