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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Hello all,
    I posted my question here and I got two different ideas, and I don't know which one is correct:
    https://www.englishforums.com/Englis...lwwcm/post.htm

    Main :Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Idea 1: Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but I did not always in this house."

    Idea 2: Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but I have not always lived in this house."

    AND

    I have also learned that :
    "We can use a pattern with it as the object of a verb where it refers forward to a clause. However, in the following examples this definition doesn't work too:
    Mrs Bell:"When I was a girl, we lived at Apple Tree Farm.We used to like it there."

    Here "it" refers to "there" not " a clause", so is the pronoun " it" considered as "dummy it"?

    Last edited by nininaz; 12-Apr-2017 at 09:31.
    So interested in learning English.

  2. VIP Member
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    #2

    Re: "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Main: Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Idea 1: Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but I did not always in this house."

    Idea 2: Mrs Bell: "I have always lived in the village, but I have not always lived in this house."

    Your 'Idea 2' is equivalent to your main sentence, but your 'Idea 2' is possible.

    Mrs Bell:"When I was a girl, we lived at Apple Tree Farm. We used to like it there."
    In the expression 'like it', 'it' is understood to refer to 'being' or 'the situation'. I can say of the city in which I live 'I like it in Prague'. 'It' is not a dummy, though its referent is a little vague.

    I lke it when we get questions like this.
    Last edited by Piscean; 12-Apr-2017 at 18:34. Reason: format sorted

  3. nininaz's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Your 'Idea 2' is equivalent to your main sentence, but your 'Idea 2' is possible.

    Thanks teacher.
    Finally, which idea is better? as both of them in your answer refer to one idea (Idea 2).
    Last edited by nininaz; 12-Apr-2017 at 12:43.
    So interested in learning English.

  4. jutfrank's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "I have always lived in the village, but not always in this house."

    Your Idea 2 matches with your Main Idea. They share the same tense (present perfect).

    We used to like it there. = We used to like living there.

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