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  1. matilda
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    #1

    Talking 183-out of blue

    Hello all

    What does the following sentence mean?

    The credits came quite out of the blue.

    Thanks In advance

    Matilda

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    #2

    Re: 183-out of blue

    The credits came unexpected (source: CALD). However, CALD gives that if somethings happens "out of the blue", it happens completely unexpected. Then, how should "quite out of the blue" be understood?

    Best wishes,
    Nyggus


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    #3

    Re: 183-out of blue

    I suppose, if you were watching a movie, and the film has abruptly ended, you could say that: "The credits came quite out of the blue".

    Doris

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    #4

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by Doris
    I suppose, if you were watching a movie, and the film has abruptly ended, you could say that: "The credits came quite out of the blue".
    Doris
    Why "quite out of the blue," not just "out of the blue"? I still don't get the thing with the "quite" here.

    Nyggus


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    #5

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus
    Why "quite out of the blue," not just "out of the blue"? I still don't get the thing with the "quite" here.
    Nyggus
    Well, because "out of the blue" (in itself) doesn't mean completely suddenly. Thus, you can still use the word "quite" there as a modifier. --> It happened "quite out of the blue" = quite suddenly.

    Doris :)

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    #6

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by Doris
    Well, because "out of the blue" (in itself) doesn't mean completely suddenly. Thus, you can still use the word "quite" there as a modifier. --> It happened "quite out of the blue" = quite suddenly.
    Doris :)
    Well, CALD gives that it means "completly unexpectedly." What for then?

    Best,
    Nyggus

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    #7

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Extra oomph:
    Absolutely, totally and utterly unexpectedly.


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    #8

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    Extra oomph:
    Absolutely, totally and utterly unexpectedly.

    So, what is the meaning of "quite out of the blue" then? Does it make any sense?

    Thanks Tdol!
    Nyggus


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    #9

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus
    The credits came unexpected (source: CALD). However, CALD gives that if somethings happens "out of the blue", it happens completely unexpected. Then, how should "quite out of the blue" be understood?
    Best wishes,
    Nyggus
    I looked up this idiom on CALD now, since you’ve been referring to it… (Is this the page you mean? --> http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...lue*4+0&dict=I) Because if it is, according to the above reference, “if something happens out of the blue, it happens suddenly and you are not expecting it”. The definition does not mention "completely".

    There is an example (given by CALD), which reads: “Then one day, completely out of the blue, I had a letter from her.” However, please note that the word ‘completely’ was added there as a modifier. The same way as ‘quite’ was added in this topic’s example. Both words were added for an emphasis, or as tdol was pointing it out, for an "extra oomph".

    The meaning of "quite out of the blue" is “Absolutely, totally and utterly out of the blue”, or as tdol was saying: Absolutely, totally and utterly unexpectedly" then.

    Kind Regards,
    Doris :)

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    #10

    Re: 183-out of blue

    Quote Originally Posted by Doris
    I looked up this idiom on CALD now, since you’ve been referring to it… (Is this the page you mean? --> http://dictionary.cambridge.org/defi...lue*4+0&dict=I) Because if it is, according to the above reference, “if something happens out of the blue, it happens suddenly and you are not expecting it”. The definition does not mention "completely".
    There is an example (given by CALD), which reads: “Then one day, completely out of the blue, I had a letter from her.” However, please note that the word ‘completely’ was added there as a modifier. The same way as ‘quite’ was added in this topic’s example. Both words were added for an emphasis, or as tdol was pointing it out, for an "extra oomph".
    The meaning of "quite out of the blue" is “Absolutely, totally and utterly out of the blue”, or as tdol was saying: Absolutely, totally and utterly unexpectedly" then.
    Kind Regards,
    Doris :)
    I am not sure whether tdol was saying in relation to "out of the blue" or "quite out of the blue." But, indeed, the online CALD gives different meaning of the phrase than that of my CALD, which gives the meaning "if something happens out of the blue, it is completely unexpected." Hence my hesitation...

    Best,
    Nyggus

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