Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2014
    • Posts: 1,224
    #1

    The Roaring Lion

    Hello,

    Can anybody tell me what the author means by give The Roaring Lion a trot?

    Too dark, toovaulty, too shut in. And in winter freezing cold, laying low maybe. Trees in front, everlastings; though open behind with a stream and cornfields and hills in the distance; especially in summer, of course. They went up and down, and dim and dark, according to the weather. You could see for miles from those upper corridor windows – small panes that take a lot of cleaning. But George did the windows. George had come from the village, too, if you could call it a village. But he was a permanency. Nothing much but a few cottages, and an outlying farmhouse here and there. Why the old brick church lay about a mile away from it, I can’t say. To give the Roaring Lion a trot, perhaps.

    Walter de la Mare, Crewe, 1936

    Thank you.
    Not a Teacher. A guy who is fond of old horror and weird literature and who is interested in English language.

  2. VIP Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2015
    • Posts: 14,737
    #2

    Re: The Roaring Lion

    The Roaring Lion would be a pub. I don't know what the idiom means.
    I am not a teacher.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •