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    #1

    How to interprete "which it wll be"

    President Trump tweeted as follows the other day.

    “If the wall is not built, which it will be, the drug situationwill NEVER be fixed the way it should be!”

    What does he mean by saying "which it will be?"
    What do "which" and "it" connote?

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    #2

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    Hi,

    'Which it will be' is President Trump giving an assurance that the wall will, one day, be built. 'Which' and 'it' refer to the building of the wall.

    Sue

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    #3

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    Thanks for the reply.
    If "which" and "it" refer to the building the wall, "which will be" be enough and "it" is redundant, isn't it?

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    #4

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    No.

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    #5

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    It's never easy to try using grammar rules to explain Trump's tweets but in this case, you need both "which" and "it." The whole phrase "which it" refers to the building of the wall.

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    #6

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    Quote Originally Posted by Fujibei View Post
    What does he mean by saying "which it will be?"
    What do "which" and "it" connote?
    which - the situation of being built
    it - the wall

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    #7

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    “If the wall is not built, which it will be, the drug situationwill NEVER be fixed the way it should be!”
    Am I the only one bothered by the fact that there is negation in the "if"-clause but not in the "which"-clause?
    Such relative clauses are pretty rare, but in my experience they generally "echo" the clause with the antecedent.
    I would have a much easier time with the following sentence (grammatically):

    If the wall is built, which it will be, we will live happily ever after.

    Fujibei, if you receive a similar response elsewhere, which you might, it won't have been plagiarized. I'm just warming up.

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    #8

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus View Post
    Am I the only one bothered by the fact that there is negation in the "if"-clause but not in the "which"-clause?
    No, you're not.

    When I wrote "which - the situation of being built", I was explaining Trump's use of the word. To the purist, the antecedent of 'which' must be the stuation of not being built. However, to be fair to Trump (that must be a first for me), Trump's words will have been understood as he meant them by the majority of those who heard them, many of whom will have used similar constructions.


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    #9

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    You really need to think of how he would be speaking. The "which is will be" is really a parenthetical comment. He interrupts his own sentence in order to convey that the situation that he is describing is counter to fact. Or fact as he is promising in the future.

    "If the wall is not built, bad things will continue. But we will build the wall." That's what he is saying.

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    #10

    Re: How to interprete "which it wll be"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    He interrupts his own sentence
    A not uncommon yes, it happens all the, you know I heard it only, he was talking with, time, occurrence, it's terrific, with him.

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