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    #1

    Phrasal verb put off usage

    Is the usage of the phrasal verb ‘put off’ instead of the verb ‘distract’ too British? For instance: ‘Stop singing - you put me off.”
    Or it can be recommended as a standard (substation) substitution for that verb?
    Last edited by northpath; 27-Apr-2017 at 12:30.

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    #2

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    It's a standard substitution.

    This is a substation:


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    #3

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    Sorry, it was a misprint!

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    #4

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    The substitution doesn't work in American English. We don't use the phrasal verb put me off that way.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    I have heard "off-putting" but "put someone off" means "to delay".

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    #6

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewg927 View Post
    I have heard "off-putting" but "put someone off" means to delay.
    Apparently it can mean "to distract" in BrE. In AmE it means "to delay" or "to repulse": I used to eat imitation crab, but I quit. A film of the manufacturing process put me off​ it.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    Does it really mean "to distract"? I just looked it up and didn't find that definition. Never mind me. I didn't scroll down far enough.

  8. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    Yes, it really does mean that in BrE.

    Let's say I am trying to complete a very precarious tower of playing cards. I am nearing the top and I have just a couple of cards to balance on top. At that moment, my friend starts shouting and waving, tickling me, trying anything to make it really difficult for me to concentrate on what I'm trying to do. My friend is trying to "put me off".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    I thought it mean to make you disgusted. Throwing up after all that tequila has really put me off Mexican restaurants.

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    #10

    Re: Phrasal verb put off usage

    Yup, it means that too.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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